Author Topic: An Indestructible Staking System  (Read 11446 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: An Indestructible Staking System
« Reply #45 on: July 13, 2017, 10:19:10 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, morganmac. This user is located in NW Georgia, Zone 7b. This was originally posted on April 25, 2013.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, movrshakr. This user is located in Zone 10a - near Cape Canaveral. This was originally posted on April 25, 2013.

gardendoc, how did the ultimato supports work out last year?

I've heard a lot of people comment on them as "inadequate,"  to use a single word as summary.  So, I'd be interested in your opinion, and did you add or adjust anything in using them.

I know this was addressed to gardendoc, but I tried them last year, too. I only grew determinates and the Ultomato seemed to work fine...though I did purchase 6' stakes and the cross pieces separately because a) the kit only comes with 5' stakes and b) they were sold out of the kits. I think the extra foot made a difference. I can definitely see how it would be inadequate with the monster indeterminate maters the EB tends to produce.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: An Indestructible Staking System
« Reply #46 on: July 13, 2017, 10:25:13 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, cushmna350. This user is located in Tomato Hell, Wichita Falls, TX Zone 7b. This was originally posted on April 25, 2013.

Quote
Posted by: Thomcatbob

I just tried this staking system since I did not want to wait on pea fences from Gurney's.  (my tomatoes are growing at a quickly rate!).  I bought a roll of fencing - 24" x 50' and set up the system within a matter of a couple of hours.  My only concern is that there is no staking on the inside of the cage to support the tomatoes.  Don't know if it really matters because it looks like the designer of the cages had some sort of staking system inside these cages and some without.

Will post pix later.

I use concrete wire bent round in about a 2.5 ft diameter circle. When plants are young, that's a pretty big space for it to be whipped around in, so I employ cross bars, horizontally, of bamboo or other handy stake with Velcro tape until the plants get bushy, then remove them. The same can be done with the John Thomas design also.

Squash took advantage of the area between the cages in the photo below, so let the wind blow.