Author Topic: Mixing Plants  (Read 6808 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2017, 08:41:59 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, kman. This was originally posted on May 23, 2007.

Front Row: 2 Green Bell Peppers, 1 Red BP and 1 Yellow BP
Back Row: 5 Brussel Sprouts

All doing well.  The brussel sprouts all have little sprouts all the way up the stem and the bell peppers are blooming and starting to fruit.  Cabbage worms really like the brussel sprouts and I had to spray for control.  The brussel sprouts tend to lean out giving the bell peppers more room.  Every one seems healthy and happy.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2017, 08:45:02 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, LoneStarKayaker. This user is located in Southeast Texas, Zone 9/8. This was originally posted on May 24, 2007.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, BronxBaby. This user is located in Bronx, NY Zone 7b.This was originally posted on April 11, 2007.

Hi All,

Can anyone suggest any books I could purchase that I could read on mixing plants?

Thanks!

I don't know about any books but have you tried searching the net for Companion Planting? It will show you which plants grow well by other plants.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2017, 08:47:40 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, CapeCodGardner. This was originally posted on May 25, 2007.

Hello, newbie here.  Not trying to hijack the thread, but I'm not sure where else to post this.  When mixing plants, do you just add the dolomite regardless?  I thought it was only appropriate for growing tomatoes in EBs, but it sounds as if you should add it to every EB, no matter which plant you are growing.  Or am I completely off-base here?
Thanks in advance.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2017, 08:49:31 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, seraphim49. This user is located in Maryland USA - Zone 7. This was originally posted on May 26, 2007.

Hi -- I'm a newbie myself so I'm probably not qualified to answer this but in the frequently asked questions section of the Earthbox site it says that dolomite can be used in any box but is critical for healthy tomato plants.  So I guess its safe to use in any event.  More experienced Earthbox growers may have a different view?  I only put the dolomite in with the tomato plants this year but maybe Ill use it in all my boxes next year depending on what others add to the thread.

Adrienne

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2017, 08:52:42 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on May 30, 2007.

IMHO unless you need to really warm the soil for planting (use the dark side in cooler climates), use the white side up if the bulk of your growing season is hot and you want to deflect the heat.

The best of both worlds is to put the white side up and if needed, cover that with a black trash bag to help warm the soil. The bag can be ripped off later when it gets hot.

Mickie

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2017, 08:54:29 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Guest, Astarte. This was originally posted on May 31, 2007.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on May 30, 2007.

IMHO unless you need to really warm the soil for planting (use the dark side in cooler climates), use the white side up if the bulk of your growing season is hot and you want to deflect the heat.

The best of both worlds is to put the white side up and if needed, cover that with a black trash bag to help warm the soil. The bag can be ripped off later when it gets hot.

Mickie

Mickie that is a fabulous idea!!  I may end up doing that next year!  That should go onto the official tips and tricks or something area!  (Paul someone, I think you should put this into a Q&A or a tip!  or it gets a Laura vote to do so!) because its so perfect for the mid Atlantic region!  Thank you!

-l.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2017, 08:57:32 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by The EarthBox Hero Member, Steve. This user is located in Northeast PA, Zone 5. This was originally posted on June 26, 2007.

Since the white / black side up issue seems to be sprouting up everywhere these days - here's an official comment on it.

The black side warms the potting mix early in the season, which is beneficial to plants.  As summer arrives, most of our plants are large enough that (for most varieties), the color of the cover is irrelevant, because the plant covers most of it up.  The only plants that I can think of off the top of my head that still have a lot of sunlight reaching the cover are tomatoes, and possibly some herbs.

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2017, 09:00:17 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, Renee. This user is located in Southern Illinois - Zone 6a. This was originally posted on July 13, 2007.

So what's your thoughts on black side up vs. white for tomatoes that reside in avg. temps of 87-95 located in full sun for most all day.  I think the idea of white up with a black trash bag at the beginning is something to consider.  I guess the main question would be, is it beneficial for the soil temps to be cooler (white side) once established and in full summer?

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #23 on: June 07, 2017, 09:04:08 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, rcdoc. This user is located in Jacksonville, FL Zone 9. This was originally posted on July 27, 2007.

I planted 1 eggplant in a corner opposite the fertilizer strip, and on the other half of the EB, again away from the strip, a hot pepper plant and a green/red pepper plant (they told me it was a green pepper, but they are turning red.  The eggplant is doing FAB, but the peppers are only OK.  Ive gotten a couple of hot peppers and 3 red peppers.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #24 on: June 07, 2017, 09:06:51 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, Woodflower8. This user is located in Herndon, VA NW of DC Zone 6b-7a. This was originally posted August 13, 2007.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, Renee. This user is located in Southern Illinois - Zone 6a. This was originally posted on July 13, 2007.

So what's your thoughts on black side up vs. white for tomatoes that reside in avg. temps of 87-95 located in full sun for most all day.  I think the idea of white up with a black trash bag at the beginning is something to consider.  I guess the main question would be, is it beneficial for the soil temps to be cooler (white side) once established and in full summer?


Because of the wonderful watering system, the hot weather doesn't hurt the plants, but when its that hot the skins of tomatoes and cukes are thicker and tougher. So I'm going to try black bags early and put the cover white side up, that's a great idea.
I know white rocks attract some bugs, so I wonder if anyone has experience with bugs with white v black side. 
It may just be a bugless year for me since even the Japanese beetles which are always eating my roses have been minimal this year.
nan

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2017, 09:09:49 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, PrimoPepper. This user is located in Holiday, Florida - Zone 9b. This was originally posted on September 12, 2007.

Regarding peppers:  (taken from www.fiery-foods.com)

Earthbox, or not, one should consult the following before growing pepper families in the same EB, or farm, for that matter.

Crossing Possibilities

Any two varieties of the same pod type or species will cross, such as jalape?os crossing with piquins. Within the annuums, all varieties of all pod types will cross. Among the five species, the following scenario occurs.

Annuum: Crosses prolifically with chinense, sporadically with baccatum and frutescens, does not cross with pubescens.

Baccatum: Crosses sporadically with annuum, chinense, and frutescens; does not cross with pubescens. However, baccatum only produces sterile hybrids with other species.

Chinense: Crosses prolifically with annuum, sporadically with frutescens and baccatum, does not cross with pubescens.

Frutescens: Crosses sporadically with annuum, baccatum, and chinense; does not cross with pubescens.

Pubescens: Does not cross with any of the other species.
 

Gardeners can now determine which peppers will cross and which will not. For example, nothing will cross with a rocoto, so all rocoto seeds produced in a mixed garden will be true. It is somewhat safe to plant aj?s next to habaneros, because they only sporadically cross. Likewise it is somewhat safe to plant tabascos next to jalape?os or habaneros. It is relatively easy to produce hybrids of the annuum varieties with habaneros. In some cases, the second generation seed viability depends on which species pollinates the other. When frutescens pollinates annuum, there is no viable seed, but when annuum pollinates frutescens, there is a limited amount of viable seed.

Hopefully this information is helpful...

PrimoPepper

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #26 on: June 07, 2017, 09:17:44 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, brenna. This was originally posted on November 11, 2007.

Has anyone had any luck with carrots and broccoli together in one EB? If so, any suggestions before I plant? Thanks.

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #27 on: June 07, 2017, 09:22:14 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on November 11, 2007.

Hi Brenna and welcome

In my opinion, a root veggie like carrots won't do well if there are obstructions (like roots from another plant) that will deformities & stunting. Carrots alone or with a fast grower like radishes should be ok, but not with something like broccoli.

Mickie.

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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2017, 03:17:42 pm »
When I started my 1st EB I planted 2 varieties of tomatoes, grape and Roma and all worked well.  In following years I kept with these 2 varieties, but the Roma fruit started to develop BER.  Last spring I mixed a Bonnie Tami G grape tomato plant with a sweet red pepper plant.  The tomatoes were fine all season long but the pepper plant only produced 3 peppers.  One was eaten by a squirrel and the other 2 suffered BER.  I read that when the tomato plant first shows flowers, that hydrated lime should be added to the water but only once for the season.

This spring again I planted the Tami G grape tomato and a sweet red pepper and added the lime.  The pepper plant produced more but the first 3 were rotten to the core.  I then read that the dolomite may not have broken down enough and therefore did not provide an adequate amount of calcium, so I've been adding 1/2 tsp of calcium nitrate, once a week. 

These peppers seem to be taking a very long time to turn red and the first one that was almost completely red, wound up with BER.  Bonnie suggests a 70 to 80 day window for these peppers and I'm at 90 days.  The last 2 peppers are looking better but will never reach a full red color.  I've picked one of them and plan to pick the other in a few days.  They don't seem to have BER.

Next year I'd like to dedicate one EB to only sweet red peppers.  EB number 2 will still have my Tami G grape tomatoes but I'd like to mix something else.  Would one cucumber plant work, or could I try one or two bush bean plants along with my tomato?


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Re: Mixing Plants
« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2017, 07:38:01 pm »
I wouldn't mix the veggies. Stick with tomatoes or peppers or beans in each EB.
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