Author Topic: Okra Leaves  (Read 73 times)

CathyM

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Okra Leaves
« on: November 03, 2022, 06:46:34 pm »
In case you didn't know, and I didn't until a week ago, okra leaves are edible.  Apparently, people in other countries have been eating okra leaves for millennia. 

Nutritional Value:
Okra leaves are an excellent source of fiber and also contain vitamins A and C, calcium, protein, and iron.

I prepared some by cutting off the stems and large ribs and tearing the leaves into their individual lobes.  I didn't dry them, just shook off the excess water.  My idea was to saute them in butter, and I expected they would wilt like spinach.  Surprise, they started turning black in spots, then all over, and I thought that was a bad thing.  Turns out they came out crispy like kale chips!  They were great!  The only downside is there are never enough pieces there to satisfy you unless you stand there making them all day.  An alternative way is to put the prepared leaves in a container with butter or oil, massage them with your hands to lightly coat them all, then lay them on a baking sheet and bake at 350 for 5-7 minutes (checking them for crispiness).  Still...same problem, never enough. 

I have also cooked them just like other greens.  Wash and remove large ribs, then cut or slice them however you like.  Saute some chopped onion in melted butter until soft.  Add the greens along with a little chicken broth or water and bouillon, cover and cook until tender.  You can add a tiny bit of sugar and vinegar if you like, which is what I do with collards, but I haven't done it yet with okra leaves.  When done, remove cover and turn the heat up to cook most of the moisture out.  Season to your taste.  They have a very mild flavor, and they aren't bitter like many other greens.  Add bacon if you like.

Besides being delicious, another bonus is that if you're not getting a good okra crop for whatever reason (our weather isn't cooperating this year), your planting time isn't totally wasted.  Okra is a two-for-one plant.  Win, win!
« Last Edit: November 04, 2022, 03:19:30 pm by CathyM »

gardendoc

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Re: Okra Leaves
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2022, 11:48:54 am »
That's very interesting. Thanks
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CathyM

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Re: Okra Leaves
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2022, 12:45:31 pm »
That's very interesting. Thanks

You're very welcome, gardendoc.  BTW, on more than one occasion, you've referred to sharing your killer okra recipes.  I haven't been able to locate those if you have posted them somewhere.  I would be interested in seeing them.  Thanks!