Author Topic: Pruning Zucchini  (Read 2088 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Pruning Zucchini
« on: June 23, 2017, 11:30:08 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, morganmac. This user is located in NW Georgia, Zone 7b. This was originally posted on June 6, 2013.

Came across this article and video as I was looking up if/how to prune zucchini. My main issue is when the leaves reach the ground, the ants move in. Mostly I wanted to know if it would hurt to trim back the oldest growth, so I doubt I'll actually try this particular method to this extent, but I thought it was interesting and worth a look if the size of bush squash plants has kept anyone from growing them. Supposedly they've gotten the plant's footprint down to one square foot...incredible!

http://www.mysquarefootgarden.net/pruning-zucchini/

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2017, 11:32:12 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, AnnieEm. This user is located in Zone 10a, South Orange County, CA. This was originally posted on June 11, 2013.

Very interesting.. I'm glad to see that pruning is OK, because that is what my poor zucchini lools looks like now, as I prune more and more mildewey leaves away. The new leaves always look good, and the plant bravely keeps putting out zucchinis for me.

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2017, 11:32:45 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, morganmac. This user is located in NW Georgia, Zone 7b. This was originally posted on June 12, 2013.

After some further consideration, I think I'm going to try this. The dogs keep thinking the lower leaves are fire hydrants!  Angry

I put two stakes in the ground by either vine and I'm going to start training them in that direction. I might not prune quite so aggressively, but we'll see. It's a resilient plant. Powdery mildew isn't a concern as I planted a resistant variety, but it might be interesting to see how this goes!

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2017, 11:34:13 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, Psyche. This user is located in Zone 7a, Maryland. This was originally posted on June 12, 2013.

This is really interesting and not too late for me to try to thread in a few stakes.

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2017, 11:35:11 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, AnnieEm. This user is located in Zone 10a, South Orange County, CA. This was originally posted on June 14, 2013.
Quote
Powdery mildew isn't a concern as I planted a resistant variety

I planted a mildew resistant variety this year (Dundee F1 Hybrid), but for me in the marine layer, I found that mildew resistant is not mildew proof :-(

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2017, 11:37:35 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on June 14, 2013.

I only prune off the lower leaves when they turn yellow from age or are diseased.

The pea fence is great for containing the plant as it grows. It's the only way to go for me since I tried it last year.

Mickie

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2017, 11:40:03 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, baileyj. This user is located in Zone 7A --- Annapolis, Maryland. This was originally posted on June 15,
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What strange looking plants once pruned, I may try a bit if it gives more yield...
Amazing how quickly zucchini grow...in a week mine have gone from tiny seedlings to huge leaves awaiting flowers. 
I am trying the pea fences with netting and so far so good...one box I will either remove the netting or have to hand pollinate as it is not self pollinating.
The fence seems to work well, holding up the huge leaves....

Judi

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2017, 11:41:10 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, morganmac. This user is located in NW Georgia, Zone 7b. This was originally posted on June 15, 2013.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, baileyj. This user is located in Zone 7A --- Annapolis, Maryland. This was originally posted on June 15,
2013.


What strange looking plants once pruned, I may try a bit if it gives more yield...
Amazing how quickly zucchini grow...in a week mine have gone from tiny seedlings to huge leaves awaiting flowers. 
I am trying the pea fences with netting and so far so good...one box I will either remove the netting or have to hand pollinate as it is not self pollinating.
The fence seems to work well, holding up the huge leaves....

Judi


They look like palm trees!

I don't even mind if it doesn't improve the yield (or even reduces it a bit) because we always have more zucchini than we know what to do with. Mostly I'm just paranoid about keeping things in the garden neat and clean in this rain and humidity we're dealing with.

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2017, 11:42:47 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, Perky. This user is located in Bedford, VA; USDA Zone 7A. This was originally posted on August 4, 2013.

I know this reply is a bit late, but I just wanted to thank morganmac for that video link and to share my experience with the technique.

I am following that pruning technique with my one yellow one-ball, my two Cavalli, and my two Tiger Zucchini plants.  For support I am using the Earth Box staking system and supporting the vines with ribbon tied to the netting.  The vines themselves tend to turn as they grow, so I have to rework the ribbons.  But I have been pruning off all the older leaves/stems as I harvest the Zukes.  It makes harvesting much easier not having to fight my way through all those prickly leaves.  Pruning the leaves off that way also allows me to get in closer for Powdery Mildew inspection.  Leaf pruning also helps prevent the plants/boxes from being wind catchers, especially on a second story deck.

Perky

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2017, 11:43:28 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, morganmac. This user is located in NW Georgia, Zone 7b. This was originally posted on August 5, 2013.

Good to hear someone made this technique work. I think I tried to adopt it too late, because the vines steadfastly didn't want to be vertical. I did keep pruning off leaves, though, and it did make harvesting (and walking by the plant!) much easier. Might try this technique from the beginning next year and see how it does for me.

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Re: Pruning Zucchini
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2017, 11:45:03 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, LaurainFL. This user is located in Zone 8b/9a, NW Florida. This was originally posted on August 5, 2013.

Same here - started too late and the plant refused to cooperate. I'll try this again, from the beginning next time. Hopefully having the leaves elevated and thinned out will help with air circulation and make powdery mildew easier to control.