Author Topic: Soggy soil  (Read 15535 times)

sebeaupre1

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Soggy soil
« on: October 27, 2022, 02:03:13 pm »
I'm concerned that my soil stays too soggy and that is harming roots of plants (no air to breathe.)  When I dump it out to dry at the end of the season, the soil is almost wet.  My cherry tomato plants did well, but not the full-size tomatoes. 

I've been using earthboxes for ten years.  I live in Northern California (near San Jose.)  I place my drip irrigation line into the water tube, so the soil does not get watered from the top.  Any excess goes out the holes at the bottom of the system, as it should.  But - should the soil be so wet all the time? 

I am wondering if I should add a bit of sand (or something lighter?) to the Organic potting mix before filling this year hoping that may keep the soil moist, but not soggy. 

I would love advice.  Thank you. 


gardendoc

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Re: Soggy soil
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2022, 10:03:51 am »
If you are using professional peat-based container mix you shouldn't have any soggy conditions. In my experience when compost and other materials are used the mix particle size and physical properties get compromised and lead to soggy conditions.
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JessieJim1

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Re: Soggy soil
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2023, 03:28:03 am »
It's possible that the soil in your earthboxes is retaining too much moisture, which can lead to root rot and other issues. Adding sand or other materials to your potting mix could potentially help with drainage and prevent the soil from becoming too soggy.

gardendoc

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Re: Soggy soil
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2023, 07:46:03 pm »
If you're using professional container mix there's no need to add anything as they're engineered to have the proper physical characteristics
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