Author Topic: Compost Tea Concentrate  (Read 3838 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Compost Tea Concentrate
« on: June 14, 2017, 11:40:01 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Jr. Member, oldsarge. This was originally posted on August 7, 2012.

has anyone besides myself had any luck with compost tea concentrate. my compost pile was not working fast enough so I purchased noncentrate. 1 tbsp per gallon of water, stir and let stand 24hrs. then I pour 2 cups right on the root stem per plant. seemed to worked great for my tomatoes and peppers, carrots. had a good harvest so far. central Florida is very hot and rainy and muggy august and sept, and am getting ready for second planting.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Compost Tea Concentrate
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2017, 11:41:14 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, will6659. This was originally posted on May 24, 2014.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Jr. Member, oldsarge. This was originally posted on August 7, 2012.

has anyone besides myself had any luck with compost tea concentrate. my compost pile was not working fast enough so I purchased noncentrate. 1 tbsp per gallon of water, stir and let stand 24hrs. then I pour 2 cups right on the root stem per plant. seemed to worked great for my tomatoes and peppers, carrots. had a good harvest so far. central Florida is very hot and rainy and muggy august and sept, and am getting ready for second planting.

I use my EB with biological techniques and I am having excellent results.  No fertilizer strip, but the EB mixture is 1/3 worm castings, 1/3 ProMix, and 1/3 Coast of Maine lobster compost. I also add Azomite. I water from the top 3x a week with compost tea, (from Boogie Brew) and keep the reservoir filled with de-chlorinated, de-chloramined water.

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Re: Compost Tea Concentrate
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2017, 11:42:26 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Guest, cushman350. This was originally posted on May 24, 2014.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, will6659. This was originally posted on May 24, 2014.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Jr. Member, oldsarge. This was originally posted on August 7, 2012.

has anyone besides myself had any luck with compost tea concentrate. my compost pile was not working fast enough so I purchased noncentrate. 1 tbsp per gallon of water, stir and let stand 24hrs. then I pour 2 cups right on the root stem per plant. seemed to worked great for my tomatoes and peppers, carrots. had a good harvest so far. central Florida is very hot and rainy and muggy august and sept, and am getting ready for second planting.

I use my EB with biological techniques and I am having excellent results.  No fertilizer strip, but the EB mixture is 1/3 worm castings, 1/3 ProMix, and 1/3 Coast of Maine lobster compost. I also add Azomite. I water from the top 3x a week with compost tea, (from Boogie Brew) and keep the reservoir filled with de-chlorinated, de-chloramined water.

Interesting, excellent results with biological techniques and no fertilizer strip. So there is definitely life in the media converting organic material into useable nutrients. Bravo.

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Re: Compost Tea Concentrate
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2017, 11:44:00 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, Sun City Linda. This user is located in SoCal Inland 9A. This was originally posted on May 24, 2009.

Cush - A lot of Promix has Mycos added.  Ill repeat my mantra: Growing organically in a SWC works really good, until it doesn't!  Then there's my other mantra: Growing organically in a SWC is certainly possible if you have unlimited time and money.  Good luck to all!

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Re: Compost Tea Concentrate
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2017, 11:46:11 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, Eric-02476. This user is located in Zone 6A, Eastern MA. This was originally posted on May 24, 2014.
Quote
Interesting, excellent results with biological techniques and no fertilizer strip. So there is definitely life in the media converting organic material into useable nutrients. Bravo.

Yes, I think this is a better test of the question than using an organic fertilizer strip such as the EB Organic fert or the Espoma "Tones," as there is even less of a question of any nutrients being quickly available.

That said, as I recently posted on another thread, it seems obvious to me that microbial life in the media certainly can and does convert organic fertilizers into nutrients that are available to the plant - I have 20 boxes going now, 100% organic and the plants are absolutely thriving. They'd quickly starve otherwise. The issue, as Sun City Linda regularly points out, is that organic boxes are more work and more expensive, and results can be inconsistent, especially with tomatoes. Ill see how mine do this season, I'm trying some new things in the media besides my usual Espoma Garden Tone for the fert strip.

Having hijacked the thread a bit, I will now echo Cushmans admiration for the success so far of this unorthodox system and hope we get updates. Before Linda takes me to task, please note I am curious and intrigued, not suggesting this sort of thing is appropriate for the masses to try

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Re: Compost Tea Concentrate
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2017, 11:55:46 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, will6659. This was originally posted on May 24, 2014.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Full Member, Eric-02476. This user is located in Zone 6A, Eastern MA. This was originally posted on May 24, 2014.
Quote
Interesting, excellent results with biological techniques and no fertilizer strip. So there is definitely life in the media converting organic material into useable nutrients. Bravo.

Yes, I think this is a better test of the question than using an organic fertilizer strip such as the EB Organic fert or the Espoma "Tones," as there is even less of a question of any nutrients being quickly available.

That said, as I recently posted on another thread, it seems obvious to me that microbial life in the media certainly can and does convert organic fertilizers into nutrients that are available to the plant - I have 20 boxes going now, 100% organic and the plants are absolutely thriving. They'd quickly starve otherwise. The issue, as Sun City Linda regularly points out, is that organic boxes are more work and more expensive, and results can be inconsistent, especially with tomatoes. Ill see how mine do this season, I'm trying some new things in the media besides my usual Espoma Garden Tone for the fert strip.

Having hijacked the thread a bit, I will now echo Cushmans admiration for the success so far of this unorthodox system and hope we get updates. Before Linda takes me to task, please note I am curious and intrigued, not suggesting this sort of thing is appropriate for the masses to try

I will post pictures as my bio Earthboxes progress.  Already I am seeing massive leaf size on the plants.
More work, I agree but well worth it in my opinion.  I dont care for petroleum by products as food for my plants which I am going to eat.

Using compost and worm castings as a base with ProMix does not seem to interfere with wicking, and if it did I would water my plants from the top which I have to do with compost tea a few times a week anyway. I have other wild EB without a cover or fertilizer strip and I water from the soil surface when dry. A couple of these boxes have been around and ongoing for 3 or more years.