Author Topic: Gardening Tip of the Day  (Read 7675 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2017, 09:07:57 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, writeone. This user is located in Orlando, FL, Zone 9B. This was originally posted on March 11, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Horticulturalist The Earthbox Hero Member, kathy. This user is located in the mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

I will 2nd Kathy's response that sprays with Chlorothalonil as an active ingredient work well.  Its better to prevent fungus than catch up killing it.  However, Chlorothalonil did great for me.  Having grown Sweet Success for a couple years, it is great tasting and nearly seedless should you isolate it from other varieties.

Now, I am going to second this....best control is prevention, spraying every 7 days before the powdery mildew, etc shows up is the best control~!

Is Chlorothalonil a certified organic product?

How does it compare to using a copper product?

How is mildew vs early blight distinguished?

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #31 on: June 14, 2017, 09:09:01 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on March 11, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, writeone. This user is located in Orlando, FL, Zone 9B. This was originally posted on March 11, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Horticulturalist The Earthbox Hero Member, kathy. This user is located in the mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

I will 2nd Kathy's response that sprays with Chlorothalonil as an active ingredient work well.  Its better to prevent fungus than catch up killing it.  However, Chlorothalonil did great for me.  Having grown Sweet Success for a couple years, it is great tasting and nearly seedless should you isolate it from other varieties.

Now, I am going to second this....best control is prevention, spraying every 7 days before the powdery mildew, etc shows up is the best control~!

Is Chlorothalonil a certified organic product?

How does it compare to using a copper product?

How is mildew vs early blight distinguished?

Not organic. I understand its much better than copper. I don't know the details.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #32 on: June 14, 2017, 09:10:46 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, writeone. This user is located in Orlando, FL, Zone 9B. This was originally posted on March 24, 2012.

Quote
Actually, I should have been more clear, I never replace the old plants, just add a new plant every 2 weeks, and I do 5 plants per box. I also start a new "late cuke" box or two right about now, as I just pulled the last of my radishes from an EarthBox, and by this weekend my spinach box will be retired.

Good idea on the topic...I think I will start a new topic Gardening Tip of the Day and move Johns and the following posts.

Can this work with tomatoes too? I have two tom plants to be transplanted into a EB. One is about a foot tall, the other is 3"-4". If I plant them both, will the larger one steal the nutrients from the younger? Or will it work much like the succession planting with cucumbers?

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #33 on: June 14, 2017, 09:12:17 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, ErnieHodge. This user is located in Lake Panasoffkee, FL, Zone 9a. This was originally posted on March 25, 2012.

OK,

Here's a question for Kathy and anyone else who plants multiply types of cucumbers.

How far apart do I need to keep the EBs?

Right now I have three Sweet Success in an EB and its on one side of the house. I plan on putting in two more EBs with Alibi and County Fair. I need to know if I can put the EBs with the last two next to each other and let them share a trellis. Or if that's not advisable how far apart should they be.

Ill be hooking the EBs to the AWS so I need to know how to lay out my garden. It will be on the other side of the house on the slab. We live in a stilt house and have three foot of concrete all the way around the house. Some of the EBs that will be on the side with seven will be visible to the other three that are on the front of the other side. (I hope that makes sense.)

Since I got spoiled last Fall with the AWS I'm getting tired of hand watering the couple of EBs I have set up right now until I get the AWS set up on the other side of the house.

Thanks for any ides on EB spacing for cucumbers. 

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #34 on: June 14, 2017, 09:13:21 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Horticulturalist The Earthbox Hero Member, kathy. This user is located in the mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4. This was originally posted on March 26, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, ErnieHodge. This user is located in Lake Panasoffkee, FL, Zone 9a. This was originally posted on March 25, 2012.

OK,

Here's a question for Kathy and anyone else who plants multiply types of cucumbers.

How far apart do I need to keep the EBs?

Right now I have three Sweet Success in an EB and its on one side of the house. I plan on putting in two more EBs with Alibi and County Fair. I need to know if I can put the EBs with the last two next to each other and let them share a trellis. Or if that's not advisable how far apart should they be.

Ill be hooking the EBs to the AWS so I need to know how to lay out my garden. It will be on the other side of the house on the slab. We live in a stilt house and have three foot of concrete all the way around the house. Some of the EBs that will be on the side with seven will be visible to the other three that are on the front of the other side. (I hope that makes sense.)

Since I got spoiled last Fall with the AWS I'm getting tired of hand watering the couple of EBs I have set up right now until I get the AWS set up on the other side of the house.

Thanks for any ides on EB spacing for cucumbers. 

I am not sure what you mean about spacing, I run my Earth Boxes in a row right down the edge of a walkway, so all 5 cuke boxes are together (like a train) Near the end of the season, I even end up with a mixed variety box or two, when I have a spare box or two sitting around because and earlier crop like spinach is done.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #35 on: June 14, 2017, 09:14:14 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, ErnieHodge. This user is located in Lake Panasoffkee, FL, Zone 9a. This was originally posted on March 26, 2012.

Kathy,

What I mean is how close to each other makes a difference as far as cross pollination with cukes. I just dont want to them to physically close together. Right now I have two boxes next to each other that will be Alibi and County Fair. I can separate them if need be or if it makes any difference in pollination. I had just set up a trellis that I can break in half any move easily if the two different types should be kept apart.

Thanks for your knowledge of cucumbers.

Ernie

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #36 on: June 14, 2017, 09:16:08 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, dandeanroeh. This user is located in Zone 5-6 (Southern Nebraska). This post was originally posted on August 12, 2013.

I planted peas in two staked EBs this spring. When the peas were done in mid/late June I replanted the boxes with cukes around the 1st of July. The cukes were doing fine and growing like weeds until around mid August. Now they are wilting and are pretty much done for. The same thing happened last year to cukes I planted in early July. Last year I chalked it up to a very hot summer but this summer has been very mild. Why do my second planting of cukes always wilt and die in August? All I can come up with is that the fertilizer peters out and the plants are left without food. Any other ideas or am I missing something on the planting times?

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #37 on: June 14, 2017, 09:18:21 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on August 12, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, dandeanroeh. This user is located in Zone 5-6 (Southern Nebraska). This post was originally posted on August 12, 2013.

I planted peas in two staked EBs this spring. When the peas were done in mid/late June I replanted the boxes with cukes around the 1st of July. The cukes were doing fine and growing like weeds until around mid August. Now they are wilting and are pretty much done for. The same thing happened last year to cukes I planted in early July. Last year I chalked it up to a very hot summer but this summer has been very mild. Why do my second planting of cukes always wilt and die in August? All I can come up with is that the fertilizer peters out and the plants are left without food. Any other ideas or am I missing something on the planting times?

1-- This topic is for Tip of the Day... your question belongs in its own thread.

2-- Wilting suggests Bacterial Wilt Disease caused by the cucumber beetle. Also, by mid-summer, the mildews are running rampant, and if you haven't been spraying with a good fungicide, it can take over pretty fast.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #38 on: June 14, 2017, 09:20:26 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, jeaninemyatt. This was originally posted on July 3, 2014.

I have found a recipe for fungus, also for preventive used weekly. 4 teaspoons of baking soda, 1 teaspoon of liquid dish detergent , dawn or ivory, mix into 1 gallon of water. Don't shake just swirl to mix. Put in spray bottle and spray leaves if already infected spray daily, will take up to 5 days to really see improvement. Was looking about zucchini but said also good for cucumbers.  I haven't had to try it because also read that if pattern on zucchini than that is the norm for the type of zucchini I have. Had googled "spots on zucchini leaves" and found this.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #39 on: June 14, 2017, 09:21:32 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Guest, cushman350. This was originally posted on July 4, 2014.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, jeaninemyatt. This was originally posted on July 3, 2014.

I have found a recipe for fungus, also for preventive used weekly. 4 teaspoons of baking soda, 1 teaspoon of liquid dish detergent , dawn or ivory, mix into 1 gallon of water. Don't shake just swirl to mix. Put in spray bottle and spray leaves if already infected spray daily, will take up to 5 days to really see improvement. Was looking about zucchini but said also good for cucumbers.  I haven't had to try it because also read that if pattern on zucchini than that is the norm for the type of zucchini I have. Had googled "spots on zucchini leaves" and found this.

Variegated leaves is natural and can be mistaken for powdery mildew at first.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #40 on: May 25, 2018, 11:15:31 pm »
I like this idea ! Are there other fruits or vegetables that this technique works well on ?