Author Topic: Gardening Tip of the Day  (Read 7278 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2017, 08:43:45 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Instructions from Jung Seed  The ultimate burpless cucumber for growing inside or outdoors. Produces loads of long, straight, spineless fruits 12 to 14 inches long by 2-1/2 inch diameter. Sweet, mild flesh is seedless if grown away from other cucumbers. Sets quality fruit without pollen. Good disease resistance. 1983 AAS Winner.

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2017, 08:45:31 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Horticulturalist The Earthbox Hero Member, kathy. This user is located in the mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

I will 2nd Kathy's response that sprays with Chlorothalonil as an active ingredient work well.  Its better to prevent fungus than catch up killing it.  However, Chlorothalonil did great for me.  Having grown Sweet Success for a couple years, it is great tasting and nearly seedless should you isolate it from other varieties.

Now, I am going to second this....best control is prevention, spraying every 7 days before the powdery mildew, etc shows up is the best control~!
« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 08:58:21 am by EarthBoxDD »

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2017, 08:47:31 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, writeone. This user is located in Orlando, FL, Zone 9B. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

How safe is it for beneficial insects?

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2017, 08:48:38 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Okay for bees, fact sheet below.
http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/pesticides/infosheets/chlorothalonil.pdf

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2017, 08:50:01 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, ErnieHodge. This user is located in Lake Panasoffkee, FL, Zone 9a. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Thanks for the reply's and is this something I can get at Lowes or Home Depot?

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2017, 08:51:17 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, seansmum. This user is located in Queensbury, NY, Zone 4-5. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Instructions from Jung Seed  The ultimate burpless cucumber for growing inside or outdoors. Produces loads of long, straight, spineless fruits 12 to 14 inches long by 2-1/2 inch diameter. Sweet, mild flesh is seedless if grown away from other cucumbers. Sets quality fruit without pollen. Good disease resistance. 1983 AAS Winner.

I'm sorry, but, I really wanted to know the reason why, so I can understand how plants affect each other.
Sue

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2017, 08:52:41 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, seansmum. This user is located in Queensbury, NY, Zone 4-5. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Instructions from Jung Seed  The ultimate burpless cucumber for growing inside or outdoors. Produces loads of long, straight, spineless fruits 12 to 14 inches long by 2-1/2 inch diameter. Sweet, mild flesh is seedless if grown away from other cucumbers. Sets quality fruit without pollen. Good disease resistance. 1983 AAS Winner.

I'm sorry, but, I really wanted to know the reason why, so I can understand how plants affect each other.
Sue

In a nutshell... if there is pollen floating around the air from other cuke varieties, the Sweet Success will become fertile and produce seeds. The fruit will form, regardless... fertilized (with seeds) or not (no seeds). This is true of other seedless or parthenocarpic varieties.

Mickie
« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 09:02:21 am by EarthBoxDD »

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2017, 08:53:37 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Sue, you have a good question. Many new hybrid varieties of vegetables are more sensitive to being cross-pollinated, that is for example having a bee carry pollen from one plant to another. The Sweet Success cucumber is one that if pollinated by pollen from the blossoms of the Alibi cucumber will result in Sweet Success cucumbers that have misshapen fruit with more seeds.  If you want to enjoy the full benefits of this variety, and grow them close to your Alibi cucumbers, then consider covering the Sweet Success with on of the EarthBox insect nets.  The Sweet Success will churn out cucumbers with no bees needed.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2017, 08:55:01 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, seansmum. This user is located in Queensbury, NY, Zone 4-5. This was originally posted on March 7, 2012.

Thanks,
This is great information. I'm trying to learn as much as I can about growing. I find it fascinating!
Sue

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2017, 08:56:29 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Horticulturalist The Earthbox Hero Member, kathy. This user is located in the mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 6, 2012.

Sue, you have a good question. Many new hybrid varieties of vegetables are more sensitive to being cross-pollinated, that is for example having a bee carry pollen from one plant to another. The Sweet Success cucumber is one that if pollinated by pollen from the blossoms of the Alibi cucumber will result in Sweet Success cucumbers that have misshapen fruit with more seeds.  If you want to enjoy the full benefits of this variety, and grow them close to your Alibi cucumbers, then consider covering the Sweet Success with on of the EarthBox insect nets.  The Sweet Success will churn out cucumbers with no bees needed.

I have grown my sweet success cukes next to other varieties for years and get absolutely no misshaped fruit??? I cant say about the seeds, because I have never noticed (doesnt matter to me) But I grow mine on the staking system and get beautiful long straight fruits, and with my succession planting method by the end of the year, they are sometimes mixed in the same box.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2017, 09:00:19 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, chibearsinfo. This user is located in Zone 4. This was originally posted on March 8, 2012.

I have heard the cukes do not transplant well.  Do you direct seed or do you transplant cukes?

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2017, 09:01:27 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on March 8, 2012.

I transplant mine.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2017, 09:03:12 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, deep. This user is located in Zone 5a, Northern Indiana. This was originally posted on March 8, 2012.

Having tried peat pellets and also peat pots, my experiences may be different than others.  I noticed cucumbers with 4 to 6 true leaves growing in peat pots did not do as well when moved to an EarthBox.  However, cucumbers with 1 to 2 true leaves growing in peat pellets did excellent when transplanted to an EarthBox.  Those are two different experiences with more than one variable, and I am sure that peat pots are used successfully by many.  The larger peat or coco pellets found in chain stores for starting tomatoes are what I am using this year, in conjunction with a Burpee Self Watering Eco Friendly seed starter.

Kathy, of the EarthBox company, staggers her plantings of cucumbers to extend the season.  This is a good tip that I will experiment doing this year.  Different cucumber varieties have different harvest periods, such as 2, 3, or 4 weeks, which makes succession planting a good choice.  Mjb8743s experiences got me to try a 2/3 pattern planting of 5 pickling/fresh eating cucumbers to an EarthBox, which did wonderful for me for the high-producing, 4-6 vine, parthnocarpic variety that I grew last summer.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2017, 09:04:13 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Horticulturalist The Earthbox Hero Member, kathy. This user is located in the mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4. This was originally posted on March 8, 2012.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on March 8, 2012.

I transplant mine.

I have never had any trouble transplanting cukes or any of the cucurbits. I do both, but mostly transplants.

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Re: Gardening Tip of the Day
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2017, 09:05:44 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Jr. Member, oldsarge. This was originally posted on March 11, 2012.

PUT IN THREE CUC PLANTS LAST WEEK AND WILL START 2 MORE TOMORROW IN THE MORNING. 6 SQUASH PLANTS, 5 PEPPER PLANTS, 8 ROMA, 3 BIG BOYS AND CHERRY AND GRAPE TOMATOS, BEANS PEAS AND CABBAGE SHOULD HOLD ME THRU THE SUMMER, LETTUCE AND HERBS ARE ALSO INCLUDED. I FORGOT 2 BABY ARTICOKE PLANTS GOING STRONG. NOT BAD FOR 82 AND DISABLED VET. LOVE IT.