Author Topic: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?  (Read 11058 times)

EarthBoxAdmin

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Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« on: June 08, 2017, 08:34:30 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Active Member, ksfeeman. This was originally posted on May 2, 2006.

Nearly 3 weeks ago, I ordered the staking kits for the new earthboxes. They haven't arrived yet.
The tomatoes I started are in desperate need for planting, but I have been waiting to get the staking kits. It is getting to the point where I can wait no longer. Are the kits easy to install and can I still install them on full earthboxes?

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2017, 08:35:59 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by The EarthBox Hero Member, Steve. This user is located in Northeast PA, Zone 5. This was originally posted on May 2, 2006.

The staking systems are very easy to assemble and use.  Go ahead and plant your EarthBox without it.

When the staking systems arrive, you will need to put the two "outriggers" on the bottom of your EarthBox.  You wont have to lift the entire planted EarthBox off the ground to do this -- just lift one edge at a time and place the outrigger in place.

The tubular supports and connectors can all be attached with plants in place already.

Good luck with your tomatoes this year!

EarthBoxAdmin

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2017, 08:37:35 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, RobertaG. This was originally posted on May 14, 2006.

Received staking kits this past week. Cannot understand installation instructions.  Have 8 filled EarthBoxes and my tomatoes are close to 20 inches tall so they desperately need support. How about posting a sketch?

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2017, 08:41:35 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by The EarthBox Full Member, Frank. This was originally posted on June 2, 2006.

Here is a sketch of an assembled staking system.  The kit comes with 2 sections of tubing, the sketch only shows one.  I hope this helps.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2017, 08:43:48 am by EarthBoxDD »

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2017, 08:43:29 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, joekun. This user is located in Southern California, Zone 10. This was originally posted on June 2, 2006.

Is the idea behind the staking system that you tie your plants to the vertical bar closest to it and then use the horizontal bar for additional support, or are you supposed to just let them grow to the first horizontal support and then tie them?  I realize that you could do it however you want but I'm wondering what the idea behind it is.

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2017, 08:49:05 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by The EarthBox Full Member, Frank. This was originally posted on June 9, 2006.

Typically we tie one end of the string to one of the vertical poles, run the string to the second vertical pole and loop the string around the second pole, then run the string back to the first pole and tie the other end of the string to the same vertical pole where you started. You want to do this in such a way that you capture the plant between the two lengths of string. You can start at the bottom and run lengths of string back and forth as you work your way to the top of the staking system.

This works better than tying the string to the plant. Tying directly to the plant can sometimes cause the string to cut into the stem of the plant as the plant gets heavy when its bearing fruit.

Another option is to buy nylon netting which you can find at farm supply stores, and tying that to the tubing on the vertical and horizontals. The plants will climb through the netting for support.

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2017, 08:50:31 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, joekun. This user is located in Southern California, Zone 10. This was originally posted on June 14, 2006.

Hmm, this is completely different from what I had in mind.  I've been using a velcro product to tie the plants to the stake, but the way you guys are doing it sounds better.  So then the horizontal bars are just for additional support for the system itself (and maybe for a few branches)?

Can you explain the netting option in a little more detail?  I'm unclear about exactly what you mean.  Also I don't know of any farm supply stores near me so when I go to, say, Lowes or maybe a local nursery I would like to know what exactly I'm looking for.

Thanks for the info so far, next year I will probably try one of the ways that you talked about here.

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2017, 08:54:27 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by The EarthBox Hero Member, Steve. This user is located in Northeast PA, Zone 5. This was originally posted on June 15, 2006.

The nylon netting that Frank is referring to is called trellis netting, and you probably won't find it at Home Depot, Lowes, or most regular garden centers. we get ours from a farm supply, store, and it come in 15 foot x 3 or 4 foot rolls. It looks just like a nice nylon volleyball net when you unroll it. If you put it on your staking supports early, tomatoes and cucumbers will just climb through it as they grow (tomatoes may need a little guidance).

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2017, 08:56:01 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, joekun. This user is located in Southern California, Zone 10. This was originally posted on June 15, 2006.

Thanks Steve, very interesting. I might have to look in to finding some on the internet for next year as I don't think there are many farm supply stores in LA.

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2017, 08:58:21 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, tomgirl. This was originally posted on August 6, 2006.

Check this out.

http://www.reisingerrigging.com/trellis.html

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2017, 08:59:49 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, Fedora. This user is located in Borderline Zone 9-10. This was originally posted on September 17, 2006.

I've used old pantyhose as trellis ties for years and they work very well.  Just cut the legs out of old pantyhose or use old knee-highs.  They work well --- are stretchy enough to tie easily and wont dig into the plants as they grow.  You can easily untie them if need be --- or just cut them off when you no longer need them.  For you guys in the group --- Im sure you can find a ready supply amongst your female friends if you tell them why you need them.

Another trick for folks in areas where deer are prevalent --- Fill old pantyhose with hair clippings from the local barber shop or hair salon and tie them along the fences or areas where deer are bothersome.  Because of the human smell coming from these contraptions, the deer steer clear of them.  Worked well in Michigan and in the Rockies.

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2017, 09:01:53 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, tomgirl. This was originally posted on September 17, 2006.

Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Newbie, Fedora. This user is located in Borderline Zone 9-10. This was originally posted on September 17, 2006.

I've used old pantyhose as trellis ties for years and they work very well.  Just cut the legs out of old pantyhose or use old knee-highs.  They work well --- are stretchy enough to tie easily and wont dig into the plants as they grow.  You can easily untie them if need be --- or just cut them off when you no longer need them.  For you guys in the group --- Im sure you can find a ready supply amongst your female friends if you tell them why you need them.

Another trick for folks in areas where deer are prevalent --- Fill old pantyhose with hair clippings from the local barber shop or hair salon and tie them along the fences or areas where deer are bothersome.  Because of the human smell coming from these contraptions, the deer steer clear of them.  Worked well in Michigan and in the Rockies.

Great tip! Thanks!

I've got two tomato plants (Cherokee Purple and Clint Eastwood Rowdy Red) getting really tall and needing almost daily ties.

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2017, 09:04:14 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Guest, cherylrrt. This was originally posted on June 14, 2007.

Help,

I got my staking system and can not figure the netting out, it comes up to long horizontally. 

Thanks in advance!

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2017, 09:06:01 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, mjb8743. This user is located in Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State. This was originally posted on June 14, 2007.

I got mine at Burpee. Its 5 x 60, with 6" sq. mesh, and cost $17.95. Since its nylon, you can cut it to fit. The 5 is perfect for 2 EBs end on end (I'm not sure about when the casters and stake system is in place).

http://www.burpee.com/product/gardening+supplies/garden+growing/garden+trellis+netting++-+5%27+x+60%27.do?search=basic&keyword=trellis&sortby=newArrivals&page=1

My setup uses EMT conduit sunk in the ground and spanning 2 EBs. The netting is woven along the sides and top bar.

Mickie

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Re: Staking Kits, Ease of Use?
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2017, 09:07:48 am »
Disclaimer: This post was originally posted by Hero Member, Woodflower8. This user is located in Herndon, VA NW of DC Zone 6b-7a. This was originally posted on June 18, 2007.

What is EMT conduit?  I've used knee highs for years with the tops cut off...they're wonderful and stretch with the plants.