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91
Celebrity is always a good choice, Homestead is another
92
I'd like a good red that is (nearly) immune to stem cracking, but still good.  Needs to be IND, medium-size, and of course, flavorful.  My experience is that not all IND plants do well in an EB.  Most will do well if there is only one plant per box.  (I realize that others may not share this opinion, but that has been my experience.)  Many that are great in soil crack in the constant high-moisture environment of an EB.

Big Beef is a great tomato that doesn't crack much, but they are really bigger than I'd like -- 6-8 oz would be ideal.  Any ideas.  BTW, I have no issue with hybrids -- I'm quite willing to pay more, since IMO tomato seeds are still cheap considering what you get in return.

-GG 

93
Something I often do in my drip system when I pull plants, as well as when I have a totally empty EB, is to pull them from the main line, and push in a "goof plug".  Using the large end of the double sized one plugs them for good.   
94
I found some on/off valves 3 years ago that fit the thinner tubing. It was threaded, but not sure if it was 3 mm or else.   The valve screwed in the tube nicely and I only had a few minor leaks. The shop didnít have very many so I ended up with a couple of different brands.

They only really worked well for one season.

The small inner hole in the valve isnít working right.  The water flow is super slow and I donít see a change when in the on and off position. Clogged?  Broken?  The valves are also small pieces of plastic and so easy to break. I have a filter for the system.  One frosty night could have been it too.  The seals are also more prone to leak as the tubing aged.

Bottom line is Iím probably going to end up cutting them out.  Good thought, but didnít go well.
95
Questions and Answers / Re: AWS wintering in 9a
« Last post by Psyche on August 11, 2018, 11:28:58 am »
Is 9a Australia the same as 9a here in the US?

Short answer is, yes, but itís complicated.

The zones are made by USDA, and they donít survey Australia. The zones are so heavily used by gardener guides that there are attempts to describe Australia in those terms.  The USDA zones go by the minimum winter temperature.  Something just doesnít ďtranslateĒ right using the same standard to describe growing zones.  I might be more like a 8b, but thatís my option. Australia is hot with some areas marked as zone 13!

The local government uses a 4-5 tiered system with name descriptions that are more intuitive.  I donít believe it has enough resolution to be helpful.

Most serious, Aussie gardeners use a two number system using the a hot and cold zone.  Cold zone is the same as USDA standard. Hot zone is based on days above 30C (86F).  Iím hot zone 4.

https://www.diggers.com.au/shop/ordering-information/climate-maps/
96
Thanks GardenDoc.  I had found your video before and used it to help me modify mine.  :) 
Your posts are very helpful too!  Thanks for taking the time to help the rest of us.
Pam

Pam, here's a video we shot several years ago looking at modifying the AWS height, www.youtube.com/watch?v=4n4CLA58ZFA
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Pam, here's a video we shot several years ago looking at modifying the AWS height, www.youtube.com/watch?v=4n4CLA58ZFA
98
Thanks GardenDoc.  This box is a Junior and I did have to extend the bell so that it's about 1/4" beyond the end of the tube to get it to stop flowing, when I first planted it.  I kept playing with the length as it was constantly dripping and changing the length to make it longer finally got it to stop.  Maybe  I need to re-adjust a tiny bit more. 

Pam, the lack of after market fittings and valves has been a complaint for years using the non-standard tubing that comes with the AWS.

Theoretically with no plant uptake the the level of the reservoir should not be changing. With the AWS there shouldn't be very much, if any, overflow. Try adjusting the height of the AWS, trying to get the bell end deeper in the reservoir. I'll bet if you shorten the reservoir tube or replace with a shorter tube so you still have the original tube, that would place the bell end deeper in the reservoir and stop the overflow issues you're having.
99
Pam, the lack of after market fittings and valves has been a complaint for years using the non-standard tubing that comes with the AWS.

Theoretically with no plant uptake the the level of the reservoir should not be changing. With the AWS there shouldn't be very much, if any, overflow. Try adjusting the height of the AWS, trying to get the bell end deeper in the reservoir. I'll bet if you shorten the reservoir tube or replace with a shorter tube so you still have the original tube, that would place the bell end deeper in the reservoir and stop the overflow issues you're having.
100
What do you do with your AWS when the plants in one or more of your boxes are done producing, while plants in the rest of your boxes are still producing?  I'd like to put a shut-off / on-off valve before each box so that I can shut off the AWS on individual boxes, but I can't find the correct size on/off valve.  I wanted to put the valve on the smaller 0.125" (1/8" ID) tubing.  Has anyone found a valve that works or a solution?  I have on-off valves on my drippers in my flower beds and they work great.  I emailed Earthbox and they said due to their tubing being ID's, it's hard to find parts elsewhere and they don't sell a valve. They suggested to either just leave the AWS on the empty box alone as the reservoir should stay full and it shouldn't pull any water, or they said I can put the sensor in a full glass of water to trick the sensor into thinking it doesn't need any water.  We have been in a heatwave, so I think the water in the reservoir on the empty box has been evaporating and the AWS keeps kicking on because I see that the deck around the box is wet every morning.  It's not a huge deal, but I figured someone on here must have found a valve that works.  I only have a couple of boxes so I could add a separate AWS line for each box on a faucet splitter if I have to.

Thanks, Pam
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