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Author Topic: Growing Dandelions - INTENTIONALLY!  (Read 4349 times)
GoldenGirl
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Plant City, FL Zone 9 Luv My Goldens!!


« on: July 06, 2012, 08:28:53 PM »

I have been drinking green smoothies for a couple of years now, and I keep hearing about the healthful benefits of incorporating dandelion greens into my recipes.  So....I purchased some seeds last week from Cooks' Garden for "Dandelion Ameliore" - a french dandelion.  I know many of you will think this is the craziest thing  you've ever heard - to pay for and grow weeds intentionally!  For those who don't think I'm crazy - have any of you ever tried growing them in an earthbox?  We don't have dandelions in Florida, so I hope that I can pull this off.  Any suggestions on being successful with my new crop are most appreciated!!   Grin Grin
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PaulB
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Southeast New Mexico, zone 7


« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2012, 12:51:20 AM »

Culinary dandelions are different from our common dandelions.
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Southeast New Mexico, zone 7
GoldenGirl
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Plant City, FL Zone 9 Luv My Goldens!!


« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2012, 09:47:44 AM »

Hi Paul!  Thanks for your reply.  Have you grown culinary dandelions before? 
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potatohead
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9A Desert Southwest


« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2012, 11:57:19 AM »

I have grown some dandelion like greens and they seemed to do better in the cooler months. They may not grow in Florida in July, but perhaps with some shade you could pull it off, or wait until it cools down some.
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mjb8743
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Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2012, 12:17:30 PM »

Quote
We don't have dandelions in Florida, so I hope that I can pull this off.

Culinary or not, if you carelessly allow your plants to go to seed, you will be introducing a non-native species to your State. In spring, the seed puff-balls are everywhere, sending the seed on the wind with the slightest breeze or viibration.

Just sayin...
Mickie
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GoldenGirl
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Plant City, FL Zone 9 Luv My Goldens!!


« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2012, 02:16:11 PM »

Good point, Mickie!  However, as with any of my herbs or veggies used for their leaves, I don't ever let them flower as that makes the edible parts bitter.   I am a stickler about making them last as long as possible, so they are very carefully watchned. Smiley
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Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2012, 06:20:44 AM »

I'm glad I'm not the only one growing dandies.  ;>  My family and friends all think I'm nuts - actually they know it. 

Culinary dandelion usually has a bigger leaf, but the native wild flower has great medicinal value.

The whole plant is a great diuretic and it doesn't strip your body of potassium like most all of the pills will.  The leaves are very good for your liver.  The flower buds are great in a saute or salad.  The leaves add a bitter to your salad which makes your digestion work better/faster.  The roots can be roasted and ground and brewed like coffee (some people claim to like it, not me).  The blooms - if you have enough - can make a very potent wine.  The flowers are little blobs of sunshine and it takes me way too much time to deadhead them every day.  ;<

I didn't realize they didn't grow naturally in FL.  I guess I assumed all my neighbors pulled or sprayed them when I lived there.

You might want to try growing stinging nettles for your smoothie as well.  Horizon Herbs sells seed.  No reason either plant wouldn't do well in an EarthBox.  I'd plant them a little closer than the seed package says, probably 8-10 per EarthBox.

Deb
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movrshakr
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Zone 10a- near Cape Canaveral


« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2012, 11:39:24 AM »

I was totally shocked about 2 weeks ago...found a dandelion puff ball in my side yard.  Tried to pluck it carefully to dispose of it, but some of the seeds flew when the stalk broke.

Non-native invasion.
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potatohead
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9A Desert Southwest


« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2012, 12:23:29 AM »

I'm glad I'm not the only one growing dandies.  ;>  My family and friends all think I'm nuts - actually they know it. 

Culinary dandelion usually has a bigger leaf, but the native wild flower has great medicinal value.

The whole plant is a great diuretic and it doesn't strip your body of potassium like most all of the pills will.  The leaves are very good for your liver.  The flower buds are great in a saute or salad.  The leaves add a bitter to your salad which makes your digestion work better/faster.  The roots can be roasted and ground and brewed like coffee (some people claim to like it, not me).  The blooms - if you have enough - can make a very potent wine.  The flowers are little blobs of sunshine and it takes me way too much time to deadhead them every day.  ;<

I didn't realize they didn't grow naturally in FL.  I guess I assumed all my neighbors pulled or sprayed them when I lived there.

You might want to try growing stinging nettles for your smoothie as well.  Horizon Herbs sells seed.  No reason either plant wouldn't do well in an EarthBox.  I'd plant them a little closer than the seed package says, probably 8-10 per EarthBox.

Deb

Great information. I believe dandelion is related to chicory. Chicory root ground up is used as a coffee substitute and is actually quite good.
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cc-fl
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida - Zone 10


« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2012, 03:06:24 PM »

We do have a dandelion that grows in South Florida.  However, it is much smaller than the northern varieties although just as tenatious.  I don't know if it's a true native but it's been around since I was a child and I'm a 63 year old native.
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GoldenGirl
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Plant City, FL Zone 9 Luv My Goldens!!


« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2012, 08:10:28 PM »

You might want to try growing stinging nettles for your smoothie as well.  Deb

Deb - I have stinging nettle in my pasture when I don't keep it trimmed down. What a HORRIBLE plant! I know people do eat it, but how in the world do you even pick it?  Ugh - I just can't imagine!!   Wink
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Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2012, 06:26:16 AM »

I pick stinging nettle with gloves, but I've seen some people who do it bare handed.  I've seen someone eat a raw leaf, but never felt inclined to try it.  ;>

After cooking (or drying) the little hairs responsible for the sting go away.  I would presume that after a whirl in the blender it wouldn't sting either.  It tastes a bit 'greener' than spinach.

Deb
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