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Author Topic: most productive and profitable plant?  (Read 11796 times)
bdank
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Posts: 588


Zone 7 - Northern Virginia (Fredericksburg)


« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2012, 02:29:12 PM »

Since we can't control that, we just have to deal with it. BER does go away on it's own, so nothing needs to be done for it.

I no longer agree that BER going away is always true.  Not so for me this year...every new batch has it.  It just continues on and on.  Very disappointed this year and am blaming the variety.

Found on another site...
"That's most likely Bottom End Rot, and Park's Whoppers are especially prone to it."
I CONCUR WHOLEHEARTEDLY.  If anything, that is an understatement.

Oh, that's not good to know!  So far, it has always resolved itself for me. I hope I never have the problem that you are having. I'm growing Parks Whopper this year. So far everything looks okay (crossing fingers). I hate BER so much.
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movrshakr
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Zone 10a- near Cape Canaveral


« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2012, 04:56:24 PM »

...I'm growing Parks Whopper this year. So far everything looks okay (crossing fingers). I hate BER so much.

Oh, I do hope you have good results with them.  Please do tell me how things go. 

I noticed the BER showed up on mine as soon as they got any decent size to them at all--about halfway through the green growth stage.  They probably had it sooner, as most grew to hide the bottom from view (how do they know to do that!?)

Also very interested in your fertilizer experiment, although I use 6-6-6 synthetic anyway.  I used 3 cups this year due to lack of vigor in past years, but it is in kneehi's.  I have a strong suspicion that is the factor in my lack of vigor.  Not going to do that next reset.  Are any of yours in hosiery?
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stephen12
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Posts: 264


Douglasville GA Zone 7


« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2012, 07:51:32 PM »

my cuces are very profitable.........but very big
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I am only 13 years old Cheesy
bdank
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Posts: 588


Zone 7 - Northern Virginia (Fredericksburg)


« Reply #33 on: June 13, 2012, 09:27:26 AM »

...I'm growing Parks Whopper this year. So far everything looks okay (crossing fingers). I hate BER so much.

Oh, I do hope you have good results with them.  Please do tell me how things go.  

I noticed the BER showed up on mine as soon as they got any decent size to them at all--about halfway through the green growth stage.  They probably had it sooner, as most grew to hide the bottom from view (how do they know to do that!?)

Also very interested in your fertilizer experiment, although I use 6-6-6 synthetic anyway.  I used 3 cups this year due to lack of vigor in past years, but it is in kneehi's.  I have a strong suspicion that is the factor in my lack of vigor.  Not going to do that next reset.  Are any of yours in hosiery?

Right now Parks Whopper plants are loaded up with small tomatoes. They have a lot more fruit set than many others in my garden. It will very disappointing if those fruits start to develop BER. I will be keeping a close eye on them now. I thought Beef Steak types were less likely to get BER. I don't grow paste tomatoes because the BER is always so bad.

Yes, I have the fertilizer in a stocking in all my boxes. I didn't use stockings last year, and I don't see a difference from last year, so I don't think the stocking is your problem.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2012, 09:31:51 AM by bdank » Logged
stephen12
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Douglasville GA Zone 7


« Reply #34 on: June 13, 2012, 10:40:21 AM »

BER is the Adolph Hitlar of the EarthBox world.........also the black plauge............and the Osama Bin Laden......... Cry
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I am only 13 years old Cheesy
shelleyvdp
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Posts: 17

Brisbane, QLD, Australia


« Reply #35 on: June 13, 2012, 08:17:58 PM »

I'm really hoping my tomatoes will grow lots of fruit, but for me the most profitable is what I buy most so I don't have to buy it! Broccoli, peppers (we call them capsicum), snow peas, coriander and basil. We make lots of stir fries in our kitchen!
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stephen12
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Douglasville GA Zone 7


« Reply #36 on: June 14, 2012, 08:49:39 AM »

cool, stir frys are big in my mom's kitchen too.............and they are yummy!!!!!
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I am only 13 years old Cheesy
cc-fl
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Posts: 165

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida - Zone 10


« Reply #37 on: June 19, 2012, 06:04:47 PM »

cc-fl, do you think a fall planting would work?

Sorry for the delay.  Beans usually like warm weather so I don't think I'd wait too long.  Better to plant early - i.e. Aug/Sept and then free up the box for cool weather crops by December or so.  That's when i usually plant super sugar snap peas.  They aren't as prolific and don't grow as wildly as the beans but they're oh so good cooked or raw and are a nice change from the beans.  When the peas are done, I go back to the beans.
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stephen12
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Douglasville GA Zone 7


« Reply #38 on: June 19, 2012, 08:24:41 PM »

that is what we did and we got alot of beans from it so........
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I am only 13 years old Cheesy
movrshakr
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Zone 10a- near Cape Canaveral


« Reply #39 on: June 20, 2012, 10:24:29 AM »

Sorry for the delay.  Beans usually like warm weather so I don't think I'd wait too long.  Better to plant early - i.e. Aug/Sept and then free up the box for cool weather crops by December or so.  That's when i usually plant super sugar snap peas.  They aren't as prolific and don't grow as wildly as the beans but they're oh so good cooked or raw and are a nice change from the beans.  When the peas are done, I go back to the beans.

If I combine your earlier post and this one, I think the plan you describe is..
plant Kwintus by April, harvest through June
plant Kwintus Aug/Sept and then free up the box for cool weather crops by December
plant super sugar snap peas after that one ends

That it?
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cc-fl
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Posts: 165

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida - Zone 10


« Reply #40 on: June 21, 2012, 01:29:44 PM »

Sorry for the delay.  Beans usually like warm weather so I don't think I'd wait too long.  Better to plant early - i.e. Aug/Sept and then free up the box for cool weather crops by December or so.  That's when i usually plant super sugar snap peas.  They aren't as prolific and don't grow as wildly as the beans but they're oh so good cooked or raw and are a nice change from the beans.  When the peas are done, I go back to the beans.

If I combine your earlier post and this one, I think the plan you describe is..
plant Kwintus by April, harvest through June
plant Kwintus Aug/Sept and then free up the box for cool weather crops by December
plant super sugar snap peas after that one ends

That it?

Yes.
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potatohead
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Posts: 334

9A Desert Southwest


« Reply #41 on: June 22, 2012, 04:28:46 AM »

what is the most productive and profitable plant?

I was at the grocery store today and saw that they were selling tiny packages of "fresh" basil and other herbs for $1.89 for 0.88 ounces. I calculate that to be almost $38.00 per pound. I have had herbs grow ridiculously huge in my EB's so it seems the potential for profit would be pretty good with that plant.
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stephen12
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Posts: 264


Douglasville GA Zone 7


« Reply #42 on: June 22, 2012, 05:28:44 PM »

yes cilantro was very profitable for us this year too. of course we live in GA so it didn't last long...........
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I am only 13 years old Cheesy
Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #43 on: June 22, 2012, 06:06:25 PM »

yes cilantro was very profitable for us this year too. of course we live in GA so it didn't last long...........

I often wonder how so many foods that come from hot climates seem to use cilantro.  How do they get it to grow without bolting in Mexico, for example?

life is so full of 'wonders'

Deb
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PaulB
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Southeast New Mexico, zone 7


« Reply #44 on: June 23, 2012, 12:59:22 AM »

There are several varities of cilantro/corriander.  You have to choose a heat tolerent variety.
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Southeast New Mexico, zone 7
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