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Author Topic: Herbs in zone 9  (Read 5610 times)
CGR279
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Posts: 3


« on: January 24, 2010, 03:14:29 PM »

Anyone see anythig wrong with planting the following in one earth box for zone 9?

Basil
Parsley
Rosemary
Cilantro
Mint
Oregano
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gardendoc
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Ocean Springs, MS Zone 9a


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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2010, 03:24:32 PM »

It certainly will be full and I would think your EB would become a mint box in about 6 months
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CGR279
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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2010, 04:15:13 PM »

I picked 6 different plants because that is how many the guide told be to use for herbs. Should I plant less if they are different?

If mint is overpowering then I'll omit

thanks 

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seansmum
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Posts: 750

Queensbury, NY. Zone 4-5


« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2010, 04:17:21 PM »

Gardendoc,
Would basil, rosemary, oregano and parsley work?
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the*blonded*one
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Northeast Pennsylvania - Zone 5b


« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2010, 09:11:29 PM »

Definately no mint unless you plan on a mint-only box! Did you ever see how mint grows? It is so cool how it makes a 'net' or 'track' system for itself under the top layer of dirt! I put it in an herb garden once and it took over everything!
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alwayslearning
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SF Bay Area near SJ Zone 8b


« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2010, 10:26:14 PM »

Anyone see anythig wrong with planting the following in one earth box for zone 9?

Basil
Parsley
Rosemary
Cilantro
Mint
Oregano

From my experience, basil needs water and does well in a sub-irrigated container.  Rosemary doesn't need much summer water; it can be grown in a regular container in full sun.  Cilantro is more of a cool weather plant so may need shade in the heat of summer. 
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superjono
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Dallas Texas zone 8a


« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2010, 11:13:12 PM »

I think that is a nice selection, the only thing I would is watch and see if your mint starts trying to clobber over the rest of the herbs. If it does keep it trimmed in its spot.
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mjb8743
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Posts: 6878


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2010, 11:46:55 PM »

I think that is a nice selection, the only thing I would is watch and see if your mint starts trying to clobber over the rest of the herbs. If it does keep it trimmed in its spot.

No, Superj... mint spreads along its roots and pops up through the soil in the strangest places. pruning it above only encourages more underground growth. Believe it when people say it needs restriction in its own container. Even when planted in the ground in a herb bed, it's suggested to sink a large container below ground to contain it.

Mickie
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111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
kathy
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The EarthBox
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The mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4.


« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2010, 11:53:52 PM »

I agree no mint in that box.....mint can actually be a noxious weed in certain conditions. I caution you on the cilantro also, it really needs a lot of attention to keep it from going to seed.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2010, 02:05:23 PM by kathy » Logged

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superjono
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Dallas Texas zone 8a


« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2010, 01:06:13 AM »

Oh, I didn't think about it spreading from it's roots.
Then planting Sage would be an alternative that would grow better together in an Earth Box.
Have you thought about Borage?
« Last Edit: January 25, 2010, 01:11:53 AM by superjono » Logged

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Jo-Ann
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Zone 9a New Orleans, LA


« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2010, 10:50:36 AM »

Also be careful with the rosemary. Rosemary will grow to a large bush in Zone 9. My rosemary that was planted in the ground 3 years ago as a 12" plant is now over 4' tall. It grows easily in partial/full sun.
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Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2010, 05:13:55 PM »

Sage often becomes 'treelike' too.

If it were my box, I'd just plant more varieties of basil.  There's Thai basil that is completely different from 'regular' basil.   Globe has tiny leaves - don't even need to chop them for a garnish.  Lot's of different varieties.

Basil might shade the cilantro enough if you face it away from the sun.

Epazote is a good one for your climate.  If you eat many beans or Mexican foods, you'll come to love it.

Deb
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weedbreeder
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« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2010, 05:16:34 PM »

No, Superj... mint spreads along its roots and pops up through the soil in the strangest places. pruning it above only encourages more underground growth. Believe it when people say it needs restriction in its own container. Even when planted in the ground in a herb bed, it's suggested to sink a large container below ground to contain it.

Mickie

     I second Mickie on how mint likes to take over a garden. Put it in a large pot (this one is 18" diameter) near a hose bib if possible, as it likes water. Not only will mint spread as Mickie has described, it will also "jump" out of the pot (as it's trying to do in this photo). In zone 9, the pot has another use: you can drag it out of full sun in the summer or into the garage in the winter's short freezes. By the way, there is only enough mint shown here to make mint sauce for one or two meals of lamb (four persons). So grow a lot of it if you intend to make mint sauce!
     Cilantro just doesn't grow much past middle spring here in Houston. I came across culantro, which has a slightly stronger cilantro taste and is touted to grow in warm climates. I've only had it since November (found this at Lowes), so I don't know.
 


* mint.jpg (22.93 KB, 448x428 - viewed 231 times.)

* culantro.jpg (8.92 KB, 310x270 - viewed 237 times.)
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mjb8743
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Posts: 6878


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2010, 05:44:44 PM »

I like to cook, so high-flavor herbs are essential. If I were doing an herb EB, this is what I would plant:

1 Basil- monstruoso, the very large leaf type, sometimes called lettuce leaf basil
1-Basil- one of the purple types, or small-leaf globe variety
2 Parsley- flat leaf Italian (curly looks nice, but has almost no flavor)
1 Thyme- a must for seafood and stews
1 Sweet Marjoram- very similar to oregano, but much more intensely flavored, and easy to grow

In separate, large containers I plant Sage (2), Rosemary (4), and (4-6) Mint plants that I pick up at HD or Lowes. I also plant Cilantro in partially shaded totes. In very mild winters, the rosemary sometimes survives, come Spring. A little protection can help. Thyme is a perennial, and can be permanently planted in-ground if you wish. I have a patch that has been mowed, left to dry out, frozen, and still comes back each year.

Keep the basils trimmed, and they will reward you with 2 branches when you cut just 1. It will bush out in no time, and you'll get a higher yield. Always harvest in the morning when the sap is rising, and before the sun dries it out. Prune off any flowers, as they will make the harvests bitter.

Starting parsley from seed can be a challenge.. it's said it has to go to h*ll and back before it germinates. Try soaking the seeds overnight, and give it anywhere from 1 to 3 weeks. Patience is key.

Good luck,
Mickie
« Last Edit: January 25, 2010, 05:48:18 PM by mjb8743 » Logged

111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
weedbreeder
Guest
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2010, 07:20:52 PM »

I like to cook, so high-flavor herbs are essential. If I were doing an herb EB, this is what I would plant:

1 Basil- monstruoso, the very large leaf type, sometimes called lettuce leaf basil
1-Basil- one of the purple types, or small-leaf globe variety
2 Parsley- flat leaf Italian (curly looks nice, but has almost no flavor)
1 Thyme- a must for seafood and stews
1 Sweet Marjoram- very similar to oregano, but much more intensely flavored, and easy to grow

In separate, large containers I plant Sage (2), Rosemary (4), and (4-6) Mint plants that I pick up at HD or Lowes. I also plant Cilantro in partially shaded totes. In very mild winters, the rosemary sometimes survives, come Spring. A little protection can help. Thyme is a perennial, and can be permanently planted in-ground if you wish. I have a patch that has been mowed, left to dry out, frozen, and still comes back each year.

Keep the basils trimmed, and they will reward you with 2 branches when you cut just 1. It will bush out in no time, and you'll get a higher yield. Always harvest in the morning when the sap is rising, and before the sun dries it out. Prune off any flowers, as they will make the harvests bitter.

Starting parsley from seed can be a challenge.. it's said it has to go to h*ll and back before it germinates. Try soaking the seeds overnight, and give it anywhere from 1 to 3 weeks. Patience is key.

Good luck,
Mickie
     Mickie, that looks like a great plan. You said "If I were doing an herb EB...", are all these going into one EB? If so, that would make economic sense: it would be a very productive EB. If you do this, don't forget to post some pics.
     Here's another question for you: I've read what you and others have said about harvesting the herbs in the morning, so I did that (cilantro) today for cooking this evening. By then the cilantro was wilted beyond recognition. Does that impair the flavor at all? (I forgot to give it a taste before the dish went into the oven.)
Jim
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