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Author Topic: Pickled Hot Peppers..... Will This Recipe Work Okay?  (Read 6852 times)
dennyboy
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Posts: 126

Las Vegas NV - Zone 8 or 9


« on: May 29, 2009, 02:18:42 PM »


I searched through the Recipe section here and have not been able to find anything about Pickled Hot Peppers. Maybe I missed it.

Does this 'recipe' or technique for making pickled peppers make sense? It sounds a little too easy, or simplistic. If someone knows a better way, please add it here. I'm trying to get away without doing any canning, boiling jars, etc. But if that's the only way, I'd like to hear about how to do it. I found this same recipe on several internet sites, so maybe it's not so bad.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ingredients:

   Any kind of Hot Pepper
   1 Teaspoon Salt
   2 Teaspoons Sugar
   Vinegar

What to do:

1. Put as many peppers in a quart jar as possible
2. Fill jar with vinegar
3. Add salt and sugar
4. Put on lid and shake to mix in the salt & sugar
5. Let peppers sit for a 'couple of months' Huh? in the refrigerator.


NOTE: I think a clove of garlic would help.
   Also, make a couple of slits In each pepper to let the liquid inside.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Has anybody done it this way, and do the peppers come out okay?

dennyboy

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tag
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Fleming Island, Fl. Zone 8


« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2009, 02:33:16 PM »

I'd say no. You really ought to google "Pickled Hot Peppers". There are plenty of SAFE recipies out there.
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dennyboy
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Posts: 126

Las Vegas NV - Zone 8 or 9


« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2009, 03:12:37 PM »

You really ought to google "Pickled Hot Peppers". There are plenty of SAFE recipies out there.

That's exactly what I did google, and came up with this same recipe several times. Of course there were others, most of which involved 'canning' as one of the normal steps in the pickling process.  I don't know anything about canning or pickling. That's why I thought I should double check.

Anyway, I asked, because this recipe seemed over-simplified. Glad I inquired before using it. You said "there are plenty of SAFE recipes". In your opinion, what's the best way to know that a recipe is 'safe'? I don't think that reviews help, because this one had all positives.

If anyone here knows a safe recipe, please point me in the right direction. List it if you can. Should I just get a book? Would a cucumber pickling recipe do just as well?

« Last Edit: May 29, 2009, 03:14:38 PM by dennyboy » Logged
Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2009, 04:40:08 PM »

This is safe for a refrigerated product.  Slits will help the vinegar and seasoning get into the pepper.  Vinegar should be at least 5% acidity - it says on the label unless it is some fancy vinegar - in which case it is too expensive to use in pickling.  ;>

When you get 20-30 jars of pickled peppers in the fridge you may want to learn to can them.  ;>  All it will take is a hot water bath which can be done in any saucepot that is big enough to cover the jars by 1-2" boiling water, and standard canning jars with a 2 piece lid.

Check with your county Extension office for canning recipes.  Ask if they are having any basic canning classes for the public.  Sometimes churches or appliance stores will offer classes, too.  Don't pay much for them, this is easy stuff and do pick up a Ball Blue Book where ever canning supplies are sold.  I think it is $7 this year.  It has up-to-date step-by-step directions for more things than you will want to do.

Deb
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dennyboy
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Posts: 126

Las Vegas NV - Zone 8 or 9


« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2009, 06:35:05 PM »


Ah, so it is safe. Thanks Deb.

I don't think I would want more than a couple of jars in the fridge. I wanted to learn this so I don't have to use them right after picking, but most likely within a matter of a few weeks. So it's just 'plain old' vinegar. I have a generic brand that says "diluted with water to 5% acidity" so that sounds okay.

And I can leave the skull and crossbones off the jar as long as it's refrigerated? If I'm wrong about that, please advise. Shocked

I tried to freeze some hot peppers once and they came out pretty yucky. I just picked them, put into a plastic bag, then straight to the freezer. From doing some research, I think the way to do it is to blanch them for 3 mins, then put in ice-water for 3 mins, then into a freezer bag (remove air) and into the freezer. No?

After I posted my other comments, I found a post that is very similar to  the simple recipe I started off with here, except that it's for cucumbers / pickles. Nothing fancy, just put the cukes in the liquid, and you've got dill pickles in 24 hrs.

I will have to try that since I am getting cukes now, but got a late start with my pepper plants.

Thanks again for your helpful reply

dennyboy

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Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2009, 06:32:20 AM »

Between pickled peppeprs and cukes and green beans and all the other pickled things this will lead to, you should probably get the Ball Blue Book (WalMart usually has it) and read over that chapter.  You won't want them for only a couple of months, you will want enough to last from one season to the next. 

I freeze peppers all the time (sweet ones - but the process is the same) they don't need blanching.  I slice them and spread on a cookie sheet.  When frozen, I transfer them to a zip type bag or use a vaccuum sealer.  I always have a small zip bag in my refrigerator freezer to add to whatever I am cooking.  You can chop them while still frozen if you want a diced pepper.  They aren't fresh peppers and wouldn't work well added to a green salad, but for cooking, they are great.

Last year I roasted some hot ones and then after cleaning them I froze them.  Some I put into an ice cube tray but most I spread on a cookie sheet to freeze individually.  They've been an interesting addition to meals this past winter.  A little goes a long way in a soup or pot of beans.

Yes, your generic vinegar will be fine - the 5% acidity is the key.  Some people swear by the white and others by the apple cider.  The flavor is up to you.  Some things (herbs come to mind) 'need' the wine vinegars.

Deb
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Kamisha100
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Orlando, Florida Zone 9B


« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2009, 10:46:04 PM »

I just bought my canning and preserving kit today from ball.  I found the utensil set at Walmart. Looks like everything I needed is in there. I can't wait to get started. I wanted to share with you the website Ball promotes on the packaging.  It even has a forum like this one for newbies.  I can definetly see that I will be spending some time there as well.
Misha

 http://www.freshpreserving.com/pages/preserve__fresh_preserving__home_canning_/33.php
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LavendulaFleur
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So Cal (The Valley) Zone 10


« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2009, 01:40:07 AM »

I have used a variation of this recipe.

Shi[please wash my mouth out with soap]o peppers are 3 - 4" long and hotter than bell peppers. But I imagine you can interchange pretty much any pepper in this recipe.

Plus you can eat them after 8 hours!

Good luck!


Quick pickled peppers

Total time: 20 minutes, plus pickling time

Servings: Makes about 4 cups

3/4 pound shi[please wash my mouth out with soap]o peppers (Note: Shi[please wash my mouth out with soap]o peppers are available at many Asian markets.)

2 1/2 cups rice vinegar

3 cloves garlic, peeled and lightly smashed

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

1 small onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

2 to 3 whole chiles de arbol or other small dried red chile (optional)

1. Cut a thin lengthwise slit on each side of each pepper to allow the brine to penetrate.

2. In a medium saucepan, simmer the vinegar with 2 cups of water, the garlic, salt, sugar, oregano, peppercorns, onion and dried chile, if desired, until fragrant, 3 to 4 minutes.

3. Blanch the peppers in a large pot of boiling water until they begin to soften and the color just begins to fade, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain the peppers and pat dry with a kitchen towel; do not rinse them.

4. Place the peppers, still warm, in a large nonreactive container with a cover and pour the vinegar solution over them. Seal tightly and refrigerate at least 8 hours.

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Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2009, 04:27:49 AM »

You can eat these after 8 hours because you half cook them (while blanching), you boil the liquid, and combine them while still warm.  It will end up with a softer pickled pepper than the 1st recipe in this thread.  But if you were to process (can or seal the jars) the first recipe would be ready sooner and softer too.

Rice vinegar always seems 'softer' to my taste than cider or white vinegar.  As long as it is 5% acidity and you can find an affordable source, it should make a good pickle.  I like the addition of oregano and immediately I start thinking what other herbs would be good too.  If you were to can these, it would work to skip the blanching and add different herbs to each jar, pour on the other mixed brine ingredients, and process for as long as the Ball Blue Book recommends for pickled peppers.  ;>  (Sorry, my book is in the car and I can't reference it.)

A non-reactive container is best defined by glass.  Some stainless steel would work, but a lot of it is now cheaply made and will rust if scratched - you can't tell by price either.  Go to your favorite deli and ask if they have any glass gallon or half gallon jars they are through with.  Sometimes they will be glad for you to take them, sometimes they ask for a small payment.

Ball is a great resource.  They make all the major brands of canning jars and other equipment in the US & Canada and they want us to all use it safely and keep doing it for years.

Deb
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Penny-G
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2009, 07:44:41 AM »

Thanks for the recipes.
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Gardening is Great Therapy~~!
dennyboy
Sr. Member
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Posts: 126

Las Vegas NV - Zone 8 or 9


« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2009, 05:57:05 PM »


I have two beginner questions...

1. When you are blanching, do you start timing it when the vegetables hit the water, or when the water starts to boil again? There could be a few minutes difference between the two.

2. In some canning books I got from the library, it says you should never re-use the lid once you have canned with it. Is that also true if you have used the jar, lid, and  band for something else like freezing?

That's probably not the most economical way to use these things, but I saw some Ball jars yesterday that said for canning or freezing. I think they were the wide mouth ones. There were not an Ball Bluebooks for sale. That's why I got the library books.

dennyboy

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LavendulaFleur
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So Cal (The Valley) Zone 10


« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2009, 07:00:00 PM »


I have two beginner questions...

1. When you are blanching, do you start timing it when the vegetables hit the water, or when the water starts to boil again? There could be a few minutes difference between the two.

dennyboy


The minute they hit the water.

You need to watch when the color begins to fade and remove them.

It will mean the difference between perfectly done (al dente, if you will) or mushy.
 Wink
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 08:02:46 PM by LavendulaFleur » Logged
Kamisha100
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Orlando, Florida Zone 9B


« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2009, 07:37:20 PM »

When they say don't reuse lid, they are talking about the part that touches the food.  They part that screws t on should not be reused if there are any nicks scratches or if it is bent. I am still learning too, so cant answer the other part.
Misha
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Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2009, 05:24:20 AM »

I'm still learning too.  I've been canning and freezing for over 45 years (ouch!, did I really say that?)  I've taken classes and taught a few and still have more to learn.  ;>

You should use a big enough pot of water for blanching that it only takes a few seconds to return to boiling.  Timing starts when you put the veggie in the boiling water.  Since the size of the veggie pieces will affect the time it takes to blanch them, you should watch for color change and use the time given as a guide and not 'THE LAW'.  Usually when they turn bright green they should be plunged into ice water to stop the cooking.  When you want to use the veggies you might find they have been cooked enough and just need to be slightly warmed.  Use a basket for the food when blanching - it makes it a lot easier to take the food out of both the boiling and freezing water.   ;>

Use the Ball website and your county extension office for updated information.  The library books might be (probably are) out of date.  Research is done all the time for safest methods.  If you can't find a Ball Blue Book locally, order one from the Ball website.   http://www.freshpreserving.com/pages/preserve__fresh_preserving__home_canning_/33.php  -thanks Misha!

The jars for freezing were probably wide mouth pints.  They don't have a shoulder on them and frozen food will slide out easier.  If you use them for freezing they'll take up a lot more room than square freezer boxes or zip type bags. 

The lids (flat part) shouldn't be used again.  The rings should be round and rust free so wash and dry them before storage.  You use the rings when freezing and leave them on the jars.  When canning you will want to take them off after the jars have been processed and cooled for 12 hrs or overnight.

If you buy new jars, they will come with a set of both pieces of the lid.  If you check the 2nd hand stores and estate sales you'll pay a lot less and can buy the rings and flats at a variety store or some groceries.  Jars and rings are reusable.  I reuse the flats (with a ring) in the fridge if we don't eat the whole jar of peaches, but never to try to seal a fresh jar.

What are you planning on freezing?

Deb
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dennyboy
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Posts: 126

Las Vegas NV - Zone 8 or 9


« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2009, 02:53:00 PM »


What are you planning on freezing?

Deb

Deb....

I do not have anything specific in mind for freezing. I was looking ahead, and wondering if I ever did freeze something using a canning jar, whether or not the lids could then be used for canning. (And it looks like the answer is no.)

I did freeze 1.5 lbs of squash & zucchini two days ago and stored it in a zip-loc bag. The experience I had while doing that is what prompted my blanching question. It took 4 minutes for the water to boil again after immersing the squash. That was in a very large pot of boiling water. I started timing from the point it re-boiled and it seemed to be over-cooked after 3 more mins. That did not seem right so I wanted to get better directions for the blanching routine.

dennyboy





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