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Author Topic: What does frost damage look like?  (Read 6286 times)
jasonmolinari
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Zone 7 - Atlanta


« on: April 22, 2009, 09:54:23 PM »

Weather here in Atlanta has been a little bizarre. Overnight temps have dropped into the low 40s, some nights even into the high 30s!.
I planted watermelon, pickles,tomatoes, cantaloupe, peppers.
Some of the watermelon, cantaloupe and cucumber leaves have yellowing edges, and some small dead spots. Tomatoes also have small dead/gray spots.

Is it safe to assume it's frost damage and the plants will bounce back once the temps stay consistantly a little warmer?
Anyone have any pictures of frost damage? I could post a pic of a leaf if that helps. I just want to make sure my plants aren't already infected with some disease or fungus that requires spraying.

thanks
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kittyhawk63
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2009, 10:49:18 PM »

JasonMolinari,
It would help to post a photo. Someone here should know something about what frostbite looks like. Show underside of leaves also. What I remember of it, as a child in Ohio, is that the leaves curl a bit and soon turn brown, at least out on the edges. There probably are other indicators as well.
kh63
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jasonmolinari
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Posts: 165

Zone 7 - Atlanta


« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2009, 07:37:10 AM »

Pictures, any help to what's going on is appreciated. The black spots on the tomatoes are new over the past few days. It's been pretty wet here, more wet than normal, and colder than normal too. plants were seedlings planted 10 days ago or so. Thank you,.
tomato side 1:


Tomato side 2:


watermelon:


cucumber:


Cantaloupe, which i thikn has died, as the stem is turning brown. I wonder what killed it. there are other cantaloupe plants that seem ok so far.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2009, 07:40:42 AM by jasonmolinari » Logged
kittyhawk63
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2009, 01:12:50 AM »

I'm bumping this one because it needs more people to look at it to see if you can answer the member's question.
kh63
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jon
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Posts: 126

Tallahassee Florida Zone 8b


« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2009, 06:45:46 AM »

I don't want to get all Sherlocky Holmes on you but this does not look like frost damage.  Grin

The most susceptible part of the plant to frost is tender new growth. Look at the watermelon picture. It is the thicker older cotyledons that are damaged. I see no leaf curl in the other pictures. The temperature remained above the freezing point, according to Jason. Plus, I grew up in Canada. Case closed?  Grin
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gardendoc
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Ocean Springs, MS Zone 9a


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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2009, 06:46:46 AM »

We also know frost and freezes on the Gulf Coast and this not frost damage.  Frost causes cells to freeze and burst resulting in wide spread necrotic tissue, especially in the warm season veggies shown in the pictures.  Now cool and moist weather and cool root zones can cause some of the symptoms shown.  
« Last Edit: April 30, 2009, 06:48:34 AM by gardendoc » Logged

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jasonmolinari
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Zone 7 - Atlanta


« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2009, 09:01:13 AM »

Thanks. So i guess i should start applying copper to battle whatever it is the plants have?
It doesn't seem to have spread on the watermelon, but the tomato seems to have more leaves with it. I copper-ized the tomato.

Gardendoc, i re-read what you said regarding the cool roots causing this. Is this something i have to treat for?
« Last Edit: April 30, 2009, 09:26:34 AM by jasonmolinari » Logged
gardendoc
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Ocean Springs, MS Zone 9a


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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2009, 09:25:27 AM »

Why are you spraying without knowing what you have?  It could simply be a result of the cool, damp environment and not any disease and then your spraying is a waste of money and time.  I would be hesitant to jump the gun on this diagnosis.  That said, these environmental conditions surely can enhance a fungal outbreak, resulting in a world-wide pandemic warning.....Oops, wrong outbreak  Shocked
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A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have. Gerald Ford

Be the fountain, not the drain
jasonmolinari
Hero Member
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Posts: 165

Zone 7 - Atlanta


« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2009, 09:29:44 AM »

Why are you spraying without knowing what you have?  It could simply be a result of the cool, damp environment and not any disease and then your spraying is a waste of money and time.  I would be hesitant to jump the gun on this diagnosis.  That said, these environmental conditions surely can enhance a fungal outbreak, resulting in a world-wide pandemic warning.....Oops, wrong outbreak  Shocked

You're right, i just re-read what you said. I jumped the gun on my statement.
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