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Author Topic: Plants turning yellow and not growing  (Read 7266 times)
debh
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Posts: 4


« on: March 27, 2009, 03:44:03 PM »

Okay I have 5 earth boxes.  I am wondering if I did something wrong as far as the soil mixture.  My swiss chard is turning yellow and not growing.  It has been planted about 3 weeks.  I have cut back on watering.  I was watering daily until it came out the overflow hole, but that seemed to make more yellowing.  Does everyone water daily until it does come out the overflow hole like the instructions say?  Thanks
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airangel
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Tucson, Arizona USA-----Zone 8/8a


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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2009, 05:28:49 PM »

I water daily, twice actually, till it runs out the bottom. I'm using MG potting soil in my boxes. No yellowing here.
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Currently have 8 EBs & 2 Jrs
debh
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2009, 06:23:44 PM »

Did you add any peat moss to the MG potting mix or just use it as it was?  I added more peat moss.  Do yu think that is making it retain too much water?
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airangel
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Tucson, Arizona USA-----Zone 8/8a


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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2009, 06:52:05 PM »

Nope used it right outta the bag

Great sticky here http://forum.earthbox.com/index.php?topic=3076.0

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Currently have 8 EBs & 2 Jrs
cushman350
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2009, 09:57:41 PM »

To those who are new to the Earthbox, please, for the first season, do not add to the basic instructions. We here can give our opinions when there is a baseline to start from. When you are new and change up the basics, we can't really give good help when you ask "what happened". The less variables in a problem the easier to solve the unknowns or something like that.  Grin Roll Eyes
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Donald1800
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Fontana, CA Zone 8


« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2009, 03:58:49 PM »

Nutrient shortage is usually the cause of early plant yellowing.  Since you are starting new sterile boxes that contain no nutrients from previous seasons of use (and I assume that Dolomite containing magnesium was used during box set-up), it looks like the fertilizer strip is not getting any moisture to distribute the nutrients throughout the box.  Check the surface moisture directly above the fertilizer strip.  If and only if the surface is not as moist as the rest of the surface, get a spray bottle containing only 1/2 cup of warm water, and slowly spray the entire surface above the fertilizer strip.  Hopefully this will provide enough moisture to move the fertilizer strip back within the box wicking environment - too much will potentially burn the roots.  Good luck.

Donald1800
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debh
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2009, 12:11:41 PM »

I was advised to add peat moss to the potting mix by the company as they said typically there isn't enough in the garden mix it's self.  What can I do at this point to correct (maybe too much) peat moss?  Thanks for your help.
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Donald1800
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Fontana, CA Zone 8


« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2009, 04:19:56 PM »

debh:
I don't understand your comment "...there isn't enough in the garden mix it's self..".  The recommended potting mix is nearly all Sphagnum Peat (70-80%) with the remainder being Vermiculite and Perlite.  Any other organic material i.e. forest bi-products, sawdust, sand etc. may cause problems if used.  Please read the posts on the recommended potting mix.

Donald1800
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mjb8743
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Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2009, 05:04:07 PM »

I was advised to add peat moss to the potting mix by the company as they said typically there isn't enough in the garden mix it's self.  What can I do at this point to correct (maybe too much) peat moss?  Thanks for your help.

Miracle-Gro sells a Garden Soil product that's for use in in-ground gardens... is that what you bought and doctored up? If you used either the MG Garden mix or the MG Potting Soil, then you used the wrong stuff. Adding more peat isn't going to get rid of the bad stuff already in the mix... it just compounds the problem.

Mickie
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111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
alwayslearning
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SF Bay Area near SJ Zone 8b


« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2009, 05:17:08 PM »

There was a reference near the beginning of this thread that you used MG.  

In my area of California Miracle Grow is NOT mostly peat. The first ingredient on the list is Forest products compost followed by Canadian sphagnum peat moss, perlite, a wetting agent, and fertilizer.  Depending on where you live and what your package states, I can see how garden center staff (rightly or wrongly) advised you to add more peat. Also, the peat they sold you may have been very fine, like seedstarting mix, or light and "fluffy" which would be more suited to container growing.

Now, what to do if you choose not to replant the box with a peat-based mix?

1.  Perhaps the fertilizer isn't drawing down to the roots yet, as Donald suggests below.  His is the easiest fix to try.
2.  Perhaps it's transplant shock and will subside as the plant gets used to its new environment.
3.  Perhaps the pH is too high and is hindering nutrient uptake. (Not likely if you added more peat!)
4.  If the yellowing is due to compaction and/or too wet on the roots, perhaps adding perlite will lighten it enough.
5.  If weather is a factor in perhaps the mix being cold as well as wet, perhaps you can wait it out.

Most of this is just conjecture...I'll be interested to hear additional comments from the experienced users.


« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 02:59:45 AM by alwayslearning » Logged
cushman350
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« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2009, 05:50:54 PM »

Quote
Miracle-Gro sells a Garden Soil product that's for use in in-ground gardens... is that what you bought and doctored up? If you used either the MG Garden mix or the MG Potting Soil, then you used the wrong stuff. Adding more peat isn't going to get rid of the bad stuff already in the mix... it just compounds the problem.

Mickie

First and foremost is Mickie's concern, the use of MG Garden Soil or such that is meant for amending soil and not for use in EBs.
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alwayslearning
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Posts: 1030

SF Bay Area near SJ Zone 8b


« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2009, 09:58:38 PM »

Agree, products to amend garden soil are to be avoided.  If the package isn't completely clear, check the ingredients to see if it contains perlite - don't think I've ever seen a product to be used in-ground that contained it. 

But to clarify, my comment re MG was about MG potting mix for containers.  It lists forest products compost as the first ingredient, followed by sphagnum peat moss.  Lowe's Stay-Green is essentially the same.  Out here it's difficult to find a packaged potting mix that lists peat as the first ingredient.  MG with Moisture Control lists sphagnum peat moss first, followed by forest products compost then (in order) coir pith fiber, perlite, wetting agent, and fertilzer. 
Dorian
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GreenElminster
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Posts: 21


« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2009, 02:30:42 AM »

I've used miracle grow and a couple locally produced potting mixes.  I think the local productions work better myself.  Starting from seed, 80% sprouted in the first week.  And these are items like Heart of Gold Cantaloupe and English Shelling Peas that usually require 10 days or more to germinate.  The only thing I would say to stay away from for certain is the Miracle Grow Moisture Control Mix.  I tried it on my Georgia Collards and Malabar Spinach for the late fall planting and they all died.
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alwayslearning
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Posts: 1030

SF Bay Area near SJ Zone 8b


« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2009, 02:16:19 PM »

I was advised to add peat moss to the potting mix by the company as they said typically there isn't enough in the garden mix itsself. 

You are not alone...today, for fun, I asked the nursery buyer at my local Lowe's what potting mix they have that is peat-based, since their Sta-Green isn't (at least not in No. Calif).  She thought for a moment and said, "Well, you can always add peat to it."  Me: "Would it have the same pH, then? Or aeration, or drainage?"  Response: "I guess not."     
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