The EarthBox Forum
August 29, 2014, 01:15:50 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to the EarthBox Forum!
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Planting Tomatoes and Bell/Hot Peppers in the same box  (Read 18916 times)
Rocket
Newbie
*
Posts: 4

Zone 9A - West Central Florida


« on: March 26, 2009, 11:28:15 AM »

I just received my first Earthbox and would like to plant various plants together.  I want to put one tomato plant, one hungarian hot wax, and one or two red bell peppers.  Do you think that's too many plants?  Should I put the tomato and the hungarian pepper on one side and the bell pepper(s) on the  other?
Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Logged
LoneStarKayaker
Full Member
***
Posts: 101

Southeast Texas Zone 9/8


« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2009, 12:52:59 PM »

If you want to mix the pepper and tomato, I would only plant one of each for a total of two plants in the box. I grew a pablano and a tomato two years ago and wouldn't do it again because the tomato got huge and hid the pepper stunting its growth and production.
Barbara
Logged
MaryB
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 568


Zone 7, North Central AR


« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2009, 02:13:24 PM »

Last year I planted 1 tomato and 3 marconi sweet peppers in one EB; placing the tomato on one side, fertilizer in the center and peppers on the other side. The peppers did fabulous. The tomato was suppose to be a yellow tomato but turned out to be a nondescript red without much flavor. The plants all grew beautifully and the peppers outproduced the tomato by miles.
Logged
mjb8743
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6850


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2009, 03:17:10 PM »

I just received my first Earthbox and would like to plant various plants together.  I want to put one tomato plant, one hungarian hot wax, and one or two red bell peppers.  Do you think that's too many plants?  Should I put the tomato and the hungarian pepper on one side and the bell pepper(s) on the  other?
Any input would be greatly appreciated.

This is the EB link to what you can plant.
http://www.earthbox.com/consumer/grow.html

To mix plants, cut the quantities in half. Example....
Instead of the (2) tomatoes or (6) peppers, putting them together you would have (1) tomato and (3) peppers. Experiment with what sounds right to you, but stick close to the guide in the beginning. Consider also the growth habits of the plants your mixing. Cukes are a vine and may well choke out peppers unless trained away from them. Ideally, you want to mix plants with similar habits and requirements. For that, search the web and read up on your plants. It will save you grief later on.

All melons are heavy feeders, and EB folks recommend 4 plants, and this is their revised listing. Don't let the size of the fruit deceive you.... it's the plant that counts, and they're all similar (squash/melons/cukes).

I believe this information is also in the instructions that came with your Earthbox, and there are other threads that deal with mixing plants. Use the search tool by clicking on the magnifying glass.

Mickie
Logged

111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
kpoore2001
Newbie
*
Posts: 3


« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2009, 10:23:36 PM »

Nope, not according to companion planting.
Tomatos like chive, onion, parsley, asparagus, nasturtium and carrot and dislikes Kohirabi, potato, fennel and cabbage
Karen in Austin, Tx
Logged

mjb8743
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6850


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2009, 12:50:05 AM »

Nope, not according to companion planting.
Tomatos like chive, onion, parsley, asparagus, nasturtium and carrot and dislikes Kohirabi, potato, fennel and cabbage
Karen in Austin, Tx

With all due respect, Karen... folks here have been planting their tomatoes and peppers together for ages, and had fantastic results. Oh well, if that's the rule you wish to follow, good luck. BUT please, don't tell people they CAN'T put those plants together unless you have a sound, reliable, scientific reason for that advice.

As a philosophy, companion planting may work for larger gardens , but in small intensively planted areas where many things are grown within arm's reach of each other, it becomes unworkable, thus a moot point.... yet those garden thrive anyway.

Mickie
Logged

111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
Deejo
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 566


Zone 9b, Brownsville, Texas


« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2009, 09:58:25 AM »

I have planted one tomato and a couple of pepper plants in an EB for many years and it has ALWAYS worked very well. 
I think the main consideration is making sure one plant does not "take over" the EB to the detriment of the other(s).

Good luck.
Dee
Logged
bdobs
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 234

SF Bay Area 8b


« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2009, 12:38:47 PM »

If you do plant a Tomato on one side and peppers on the other, just make sure the peppers are on the south facing side of the box so they wont be shaded by the large Tomato
Logged
deep
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 164


Zone 5a, Northern Indiana


« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2009, 12:10:54 AM »

Mickie,
I see you suggest the earthbox planting of 4 cucumbers on one side.  However, I thought that I saw you post a trial with the fertilizer in the center and 5 cucumbers (3 one side and 2 the other side).  How did that work out for you?  Were some of the varieties smaller?  Or did you plant 3 Diva's on one side and 2 Sweet Success on the other? Huh?
Logged

EarthBox member since 2009, Gardener over 30 years.
mjb8743
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6850


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2009, 12:29:03 AM »

Mickie,
I see you suggest the earthbox planting of 4 cucumbers on one side.  However, I thought that I saw you post a trial with the fertilizer in the center and 5 cucumbers (3 one side and 2 the other side).  How did that work out for you?  Were some of the varieties smaller?  Or did you plant 3 Diva's on one side and 2 Sweet Success on the other? Huh?

Actually, all 5 were Diva. They did just fine in the staggered pattern. This year, I will be succession planting, and will do 3 in the back of the box, and a few weeks later, two more along the front. Again, all will be Diva. I will be growing 2 other varieties, each in its own box elsewhere in the garden. I generally advise new EBers to follow the guidelines until they are successful and comfortable with growing in the EB.

Mickie
Logged

111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
kathy
Horticulturalist
The EarthBox
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3815


The mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4.


« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2009, 11:17:34 AM »

Karen; the rules of in ground gardening definitely differ from EB gardening. The rules of companion gardening are for different purposes. Tomato pepper  combo boxes are by far one of our biggest successes.
Logged

kath, gardening is my game,  over 45 years in the business.
deep
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 164


Zone 5a, Northern Indiana


« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2009, 11:35:18 AM »

Effective EarthBox combinations proven by experience, success, and similar environmental criteria is a good idea.  Companion planting guides are well-intentioned, passed down through generations, but infiltrated by misinformation, social beliefs, mysticism, and other factors.  See the website below that has university testing of popular misconceptions.

http://www.puyallup.wsu.edu/~Linda%20Chalker-Scott/Horticultural%20Myths_files/
Logged

EarthBox member since 2009, Gardener over 30 years.
kathy
Horticulturalist
The EarthBox
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3815


The mountains of PA Zone 5, almost 4.


« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2009, 12:00:42 PM »

Nice website Deep thanks for sharing!
Logged

kath, gardening is my game,  over 45 years in the business.
BlueRain
Active Member
*
Posts: 15

Zone 7; two tomatoes in 1 EB; 2nd EB herbs


« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2009, 01:13:18 PM »

 :)I've had many gardens and planted tomatoes and bell peppers side-by-side with great success; however, planting HOT peppers is another matter.  Through some horrific trial and error, we found hot peppers should be planted with like hot peppers.  Example:  We planted banana peppers alongside jalapenos and got a real shock when we found the banana peppers were as hot as firecrackers, rather than the mild taste we should have had!
Logged

First year EB user!
cushman350
Guest
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2009, 01:53:22 PM »

:)I've had many gardens and planted tomatoes and bell peppers side-by-side with great success; however, planting HOT peppers is another matter.  Through some horrific trial and error, we found hot peppers should be planted with like hot peppers.  Example:  We planted banana peppers alongside jalapenos and got a real shock when we found the banana peppers were as hot as firecrackers, rather than the mild taste we should have had!

See what happens when you let your veggie kids hang out with the wrong crowds.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page August 28, 2014, 08:56:10 PM

Google visited last this page August 28, 2014, 08:56:10 PM