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Author Topic: Droopy leaves & limbs on tomato plants...  (Read 17560 times)
luvgardening2
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Posts: 489

Southern California, Zone 8


« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2007, 11:53:22 AM »

Thank you all for the suggestions... I moved my EB's to about 2 1/2 ft away from the white shed that's in the background.
It's a good thing that I included pictures since I wouldn't have given the location of these EB's a second thought otherwise. Smiley

3Ring, do you have a picture, or advise, on how to stake tomato plants ?  I tried to figure out what you were doing by blowing up the picture you posted... Are you trying to keep the stalk straight to the pole.... or trying to support the limbs...  both ??

I have heard alot about blight, BER, etc... does anyone have a link to pictures of what these, and other, conditions look like ??

Thanks again everyone !!

Primo

Hi Primo, Here are a couple of links.  Knock on wood, I have not had to deal with the Early or Late blight but I have had my fair share of BER.  I could not take pics because I trashed the few that I did have.     

Here is a link w/ a pic of the BER. 
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3117.html
http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/PhotoPages/Tomatoes/Tom_BlossRot/Tom_BlossRot1.htm

Here is a link about Late blight.
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/p230lateblight-pot-tom.html

Nancy
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3RING
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Posts: 116


Bradenton, Florida Zone 9b


« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2007, 08:54:31 PM »

thanks luv! Smiley  that's good stuff, kinda disgusting but GOOD....
« Last Edit: October 20, 2007, 09:13:46 PM by 3RING » Logged
PrimoPepper
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Posts: 575


Holiday, Florida - Zone 9b


« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2007, 12:20:08 AM »

3Ring... exactly what you said !!  YUCK !!

I keep hearing about all of these different conditions... but it really does help to know what these conditions 'look' like...
Plants are like pets in the respect that they can not 'tell' you ... verbally, what's wrong with them...

Thanks again, luv, for the post...

Primo
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PrimoPepper
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Posts: 575


Holiday, Florida - Zone 9b


« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2007, 10:22:15 PM »

Update:

I moved both EB's away from the shed.  The tomato plants look MUCH better !!  Bouncy  Thanks
The Basil in the other EB is coming along... but the Rosemary died on me...
Neither the Basil, or the Rosemary were in great shape before I put them into the EB... I thought that if I put them into the EB, they would improve...

Primo
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mgmoore7
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Posts: 146


« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2007, 09:08:51 AM »

Primo
I came across this thread and wanted to add my staking suggestion.  Actually, I just do what the research center does or something very close.

I purchase two 8' 1/2" or 3/4" conduit pipe.  I used this because it is cheap, tall, strong and can withstand the element.  I drive on into the ground on each side.  Then as the plant grows, about once per week, I use the cheapst twine I can find and string it from one pole to the other kind of wraping the plants as they grow.  Sometimes I move the branches around a little to get the string under them for support. 

This has worked very well for me.  It is cheap, easy to install/remove and has a long life.  It also is tall enough for those really tall tomato plants.  I have had some tomato plants get up to about 7' tall and any commercial staking system is much too short for that. 

I will try to take some pictures and get them uploaded so you have an idea.
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mjb8743
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Posts: 6859


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2007, 02:22:28 PM »

I've posted about this in the past...

I also use electrical conduit:  1/2", bought in standard 10' lengths, and cut down to suit ease of construction. I use fittings (straight or elbow) for assembly. The first year with the EBs, I was behind schedule, so I used twine as described in previous post.... what a disaster!  As the tomatoes got taller and heavier, the twine stretched when wet and finally rotted through in several places, dumping and bending my prized babies.

This year, I used my old standby:  nylon netting available in 5' width x various lengths. That's perfect for a trellis that straddles 2 EBs. It's inexpensive, lasts several seasons, and does the job of holding up all that weight.  I have used twine to supplement the netting when the plants can no longer be woven through the mesh.

In my opinion, if you have your EBs on the ground, this is the way to go.

Mickie


* garden-2007 011a.jpg (248.92 KB, 625x469 - viewed 283 times.)

* garden-2007 012a.jpg (214.9 KB, 450x600 - viewed 270 times.)
« Last Edit: November 27, 2007, 02:28:11 PM by mjb8743 » Logged

111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
mgmoore7
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Posts: 146


« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2007, 04:56:42 PM »

I have not had the issue with the twine, but I can see how that might happen.  I have used a nylon product as well, but the last time, I just bought the cheapest thing I could find at HD and the twine worked fine for me previously.  I hope it continues to work becuase I have a 300' role.  Smiley

I forgot that I buy the 10' conduit as well and cut it down a bit.  I have used the fittings in the past but this year when I went from 3 EBs to 9 and went to buy the conduit and fittings, each elbow fitting was about $3 and a single conduit is about $2 if I remember correctly.  Anyway, I did not buy the fittings because they seemed to be too expensive.  I have just done without the bar across the top and all seems to be well.  I did use the existing ones that I had for my pole beens though and made my own trellis with twine.

I agree, IMO too, the conduit is very inexpensive and easy if you ar on the ground.
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PrimoPepper
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Posts: 575


Holiday, Florida - Zone 9b


« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2007, 05:57:54 PM »

Thanks for your posts, they have been very educational...

Unfortunately, I am suffering from a complete and total lack of planning, with regard to a staking system.  Sad
I thought that I could just go out and purchase more / taller stakes as needed. 
This being my very first year growing tomato, I had absolutely no clue as to how tall & wide these plants could grow !
With a great deal of assistance from my wife, we finally have stakes better placed everything appears to be securely supported.

I think that one of the worst mistakes I've made so far, was the first mistake I made.... That is, I placed the EB so close to my shed, we couldn't even get to one side of the tomato plants.

I have just started off 2 more tomato plants, (determinates), however, this time I have a staking system in place.

Live and learn... Smiley
Primo
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Donald1800
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Fontana, CA Zone 8


« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2007, 06:16:09 AM »

It has been my experience that determinate tomatoes do not grow to the extreme heights (6'+) that indeterminates do.  They are more a "Bush" type plant more suitable for commercial harvesting.  You may not have a staking problem with these varieties.

Donald1800
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mjb8743
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Posts: 6859


Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #24 on: November 28, 2007, 11:14:44 AM »

It has been my experience that determinate tomatoes do not grow to the extreme heights (6'+) that indeterminates do.  They are more a "Bush" type plant more suitable for commercial harvesting.  You may not have a staking problem with these varieties.

Donald1800

Also... Determinate tomatoes tend to all come in at once (desirable for commercial harvesting), so if you want all-season harvests, either plant in succession and share a lot of the harvest, or go to the taller Indeterminate types to spread out the harvest.
Mickie
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111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
PrimoPepper
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Posts: 575


Holiday, Florida - Zone 9b


« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2007, 10:23:29 PM »

Mickie,

My Mother in law, (aka, mom).... is teaching me about jaring (spelling ?) from our harvest....  so she is asking that I try the determinate tomato plants this time around, so that we can jar the fruits of our labors. 
 
When I was growing up... everyone I knew was growing thier food... and jarring...  Now, I hardly know anyone that jar's their own food. 

Needless to say, I have to learn how to Jar the produce that grows from my EB's...

Primo
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psh
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Posts: 319


Texas Coast Zone 9a


« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2007, 11:11:31 PM »

We always called it canning instead of jarring.

Tomatoes are an easy fruit to can because they are high in acid, so you don't need a pressure canner to "put them up". Here are a couple of free publications that can give you information on canning tomatoes:

http://tcebookstore.org/publications_search.cfm

Search for "canning" and Just click on the link, then click on the button that says "view pdf"


I always watched my grandmother and mother put up jams and jellies while growing up. My first experience of canning by myself happened one time when my parents went to Hawaii and left a bushel of pears in the laundry room. I was afraid that all the pears were going to spoil while they were gone, so I peeled and sliced the whole bushel of pears, and put them up in a light syrup. Needless to say, it didn't turn me off to canning, and I continued to make chow-chow, preserves, etc.

If any of you happen to put up any fig preserves, make sure you check out the fig cake recipe in the recipe section. I made one for my office Thanksgiving luncheon, and everyone was asking for the recipe.

Philip
« Last Edit: December 08, 2007, 01:07:42 AM by psh » Logged

I'll never trust the Walrus or the Carpenter again.
mjb8743
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Zone 7, South NJ, Garden State


« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2007, 12:37:01 AM »


Tomatoes are an easy fruit to can because they are high in acid, so you don't need a pressure canner to "put them up".

Philip

A word of caution about using 'grandma's' canning methods....
The guidelines have been revised many times since then, largely due to the new varieties that are not as acid. Steam canning is not recommended unless it's very high acid foods like some fruits. Tomatoes are not considered high enough to safely can unless it's with pressure.

Mickie
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111 EBs and growing... so how come there are never enough boxes??
psh
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Posts: 319


Texas Coast Zone 9a


« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2007, 01:28:09 AM »

Mickie,

Good point. I remember reading something about problems with canning lower acid varieties that are being grown now days. When it came to tomatoes, I always processed chow-chow using green tomatoes, so there wasn't a problem with low acid. (Green tomatoes have more acid than ripe tomatoes).

I think the last Ball Blue Book that I bought suggested adding citric acid to the tomatoes when steam canning. But it is best to play it safe and check on the latest recommended method.

Philip
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I'll never trust the Walrus or the Carpenter again.
Deb
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The Pacific NorthWE'T - Sunset - W. Climate Zone 6


« Reply #29 on: December 08, 2007, 03:35:20 AM »

Back on my soapbox -  ;>

Steam canning is not regarded as safe under any circumstances.  The makers of the steam canners 'borrowed' processing times from the tables for boiling water bath (BWB) processors.  They did not do testing to see if the temps in the centers of the jars reached the optimum level.  Considering the way the steam circulates within the unit, it is easy to see how there could be cold spots in some of the jars. 

Having a good seal is not the same as having a safely processed product.  It's easy to do it correctly and safely.

Tomatoes can be canned using either BWB or a pressure canner.  Ball Blue Book has several different methods and processing times.  This is basically a 'must have' for home preservers, and can be found where canning supplies are sold or from the Ball Company.

To be on the safe side it is necessary to add lemon juice or citric acid to tomatoes.  Bottled lemon juice (to provide consistancy use the bottled) at the rate of 1 tablespoon per pint of tomatoes or 2 tablespoons per quart.  Citric acid USP (available at wine making suppliers if you can't find it elsewhere) at the rate of 1/4 teaspoon per pint or 1/2 teaspoon per quart.  Sugar can be used to mask a sour flavor at the rate of 1 teaspoon per pint or 2 teaspoons per quart.

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/  is the national center for home food preservation, they will tell you all the latest tips, tricks, and safety issues.  Some publications are available for download and others are available through the mail.

My favorite info about tomatoes is a publication researched and published by Pacific Northwest Extension (#PNW300).  Oregon Extension researched the tomatoes that grow best and most frequently in our climate, reviewed Dept of Ag publications, tried and tested various methods and offered the publication to Washington & Idaho Extensions for review.  Check with your local Extension office for local publications.

Doesn't chow-chow have vinegar in it?  If so, that takes the place of the lemon juice/citric acid - in the right quantities it makes a pickle.  I would not count on green tomatoes being acidic enough to be safe without proper testing.

ok, I'll get off the soapbox now-
Deb
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